Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
I turned 39 (2014)

Sunday, April 3, 2016

2016 Berkshire State Senator campaign features Rinaldo Del Gallo III, Andrea Harrington, Adam Hinds, and Christine Canning


Rinaldo Del Gallo, III

Andrea Harrington

Adam Hinds (Photo by Jim Levulis, WAMC)

Christine Canning (Facebook: Christine Canning-Wilson)

"More Contenders In Western Mass. Senate Race"
By Jim Levulis, WAMC, March 31, 2016

Two more potential contenders for a western Massachusetts senate seat have emerged.

Another Democrat and the first Republican candidate appear to be eyeing a bid for the senate seat held by Ben Downing. The Pittsfield Democrat announced in January that he was retiring after 10 years. Pittsfield attorney Rinaldo Del Gallo has taken out nominating papers, but is holding back on a full-out campaign citing the potential costs of running. Seeking the Democratic nomination, Del Gallo says he is for a $15 minimum wage, universal pre-K and single-payer healthcare along with tuition-free state and debt-free college.

“Berkshire County is a very, very progressive community by in large,” Del Gallo said. “They need a progressive leader. I am that Bernie Sanders progressive. That’s why, if I run, that’s why I’d be in the race.”

Del Gallo has been vocal on a number of environmental issues in the area, including leading the charge for a Styrofoam ban in Pittsfield. He says combating economic despair in the region is his number one issue.

“In terms of economic development, for a very long time now I’ve been talking about trying to make the Pittsfield Economic Development Authority something that works with tax incentives and to streamline regulations, not eliminate regulation, but at least streamline it so people aren’t trying to get permits forever,” he said. “If you look at Ft. Devens or Albany — the nano-technology area — it’s worked. It’s not a new idea at all. It’s a time-tested idea, but we haven’t tried it here.”

Christine Canning of Lanesborough is reportedly the first Republican to take out nominating papers for the seat. She could not be reached in time for broadcast.

Adam Hinds and Andrea Harrington announced their bids for the Democratic nod in February and March, respectively.

On the major regional issues — all three Democrats are opposed to the proposed Northeast Energy Direct natural gas pipeline that would cut through the region.

Meanwhile, some in the northern Berkshires have continued to call for the restoration of a full-service hospital two years after North Adams Regional Hospital closed. Harrington, an attorney from Richmond, says she does not know if a full-service hospital is viable in the region, but adds that if it is, it should be pursued. Still, Harrington says she understands the concerns, such as the lack of a maternity center.

“In my conversations with Representative [Gailanne] Cariddi, she was interested in exploring having a birthing center in North County which might make sense and it would give people more options as far as where to go to have a baby,” said Harrington.

Hinds, who heads the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition, says the region has a rare opportunity to rebuild its healthcare system from the ground up. He says the main focus is the area’s acute health challenges.

“We’re seven or eight primary care physicians short of what a population of this size and need should have,” Hinds said. “Berkshire Health Systems and Community Health [Programs] have worked to fill that gap. Let’s look at what are the major reasons that people are visiting hospitals in the first place. That often relates to conditions related to smoking, pre-diabetes, hypertension and falls among our older population. We’ve been working with the health systems to put together a community health worker program that gets ahead of some of these big issues.”

Del Gallo says he is concerned there may not be enough healthcare options in the northern Berkshires.

With declining enrollments, Harrington says regionalizing administrative positions in K-12 schools is key to the future of the area’s educational system.

“But we do need to look at the number of schools that have,” Harrington said. “In Berkshire County, we need to take a Berkshire County-wide approach, to planning for how many schools that we really need given the number of students that we have. But, I don’t want to lose sight of the importance of kids receiving individualized attention.”

For his part, Hinds says in the short-term, state funding formulas and reimbursements for public schools need to be reworked. The former United Nations conflict mediator says he supports the ongoing work of the Berkshire County Education Task Force.

“It’s a quality of education question,” Hinds said. “Do we make sure that we protect some of the identity that we have around schools? If we’re going to increase our efficiencies, at what cost? In terms of how long a child would have to stay on a bus for example. That’s the starting point.”

Harrington, Hinds and Del Gallo would face off in a September primary.

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Adam Hinds: “Why I am running for state Senate”
By Adam Hinds, Op-Ed, The Berkshire Eagle, 4/3/2016

PITTSFIELD - This district is my home, and running for state Senate is a privilege.

I grew up in the district, in the small town of Buckland. My father, a Vietnam veteran, operated three small businesses before going back to school at 51. He became a teacher in my high school and retired two years ago. My mother was a nursery school teacher and then a part-time librarian in the high school.

I didn't know it then, but at times my parents quietly struggled to make ends meet. Their daily sacrifices and hopes for my sister and me were our stability. To me, my parents represent the values and commitments we hold dear here in Western Massachusetts. We sacrifice so the next generation can reach for their dreams. We stand up to protect opportunity so our hard work pays off.

Thanks to my parents' sacrifice and belief in me, an unlikely path led me from Buckland to Washington D.C. and then to the Middle East as a negotiator for the United Nations. But this district was always home, and I returned because I want to make a difference where I grew up. With the experience I gained in politics, conflict resolution and coalition building, I am eager to represent the people and region that means so much to me; the region to which I am committed.

I am running to ensure every child in this district has the same sense of possibility that I was lucky enough to feel. I am running to ensure every working family can rest in the knowledge they can find a quality job and create a future that is secure.

Our region's potential is extraordinary: we have world-class cultural institutions, vibrant cities, welcoming small towns, fertile farms and unequaled access to nature. Our proud manufacturing legacy continues to bring cutting-edge technology to the world.

But right now, too many working families struggle to make a living wage, or to meet basic expenses. The median household income in Berkshire County is nearly $20,000 below state levels. The poverty rate is above the state average.

Tolerating barriers created by poverty, low wages, or excessive college costs is not in line with our commitment to opportunity or the prosperity of our region. We need to do something about it.

To fulfill our district's potential it is urgent we come together to create quality jobs in our region, strengthen our education by addressing flawed state funding formulas, accelerate efforts to lower energy costs while investing in renewable energy, and fight the scourge of heroin.

Expanding the economy means supporting small- to medium-sized business so they can grow. It means improving critical infrastructure. It is unacceptable that finalizing last-mile broadband has taken so long, or that conversations about developing an effective transportation system persist.

PATHWAY TO WORK

Real growth also requires training the workforce businesses need to expand here in Western Mass. That is one reason I am leading a community effort in northern Berkshire County called "Employ North Berkshire". It creates a pathway to work that removes obstacles to sustained employment.

To attract or keep businesses and employees we need strong schools. But funding mechanisms do not recognize challenges specific to rural districts or those with declining populations. As a result, our schools struggle to cover fixed costs and the curriculum suffers as a result. I know the difficulties of our schools firsthand, not only because I was a student in the district, but because it was often the conversation around our family dinner table.

To support our families I am also focused on strengthening the system of rural health and creating a strategy to confront the heroin epidemic. I started and continue involvement in a program in Pittsfield that ensures high-risk youth experience hope through educational support, the discipline of a regular job, and help from a solid mentor. Together we can do more.

In my work in our communities I have been blessed by strong support and good relationships. I will similarly work with business and clean-energy leaders to accelerate the growth of the commonwealth's clean-energy sector. Through collaboration and creativity — two qualities I believe are essential for good leadership — we can secure lower energy costs while meeting our commitment to develop renewable energy sources.

I spent nearly 10 years working for the United Nations, most of it based in the Middle East. I have negotiated with local, regional and world leaders in Iraq, Jerusalem, and Syria. But my intention was always to come home.

My experience gave me the courage to fight for our common interests and the skills to bring people together to get things done, in the district and in Boston. It showed me we are stronger when we work together. That will always be my starting point, and that is how I intend to work as state senator.

I will ensure Massachusetts remains a leader on progressive issues while focusing on local challenges. I will remain shoulder to shoulder with residents in neighborhoods throughout the district working for economic and social justice.

In Western Massachusetts we know what it means to stand side by side to tackle common challenges, protect fairness and opportunity for everyone, and protect our environment. Those are our ideals, and that is why I am running.

The author is a candidate for state Senate in the Berkshire, Hampshire, Franklin & Hampden district. To reach Adam Hinds email connect@adamhinds.org or visit adamhinds.org for more information or to volunteer.

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Andrea Harrington: “Why I am running for state Senate”
By Andrea Harrington, Op-Ed, The Berkshire Eagle, 4/3/2016

RICHMOND - I am running for state Senate because our district needs a state senator who is invested in this district; who has experienced the triumphs and the challenges of raising a family in this community; and who is committed to serving this district through more than just a few elections.

I am a small business owner, a parent, and an attorney. These experiences have inspired me to advocate for solutions to our district's most pressing problems.

I grew up in the Berkshires. My family has been in the Berkshires for generations — as employees at Sprague Electric and GE, and as farmers, carpenters, and housekeepers. In my family, you simply worked hard.

Thanks to my parents' hard work, I have had opportunities that they did not enjoy. I graduated from Pittsfield public schools and became the first person in my family to graduate from college. Then, I became the first person in my family to go to law school.

When my husband and I moved back to Berkshire County 10 years ago, we grappled with the challenge of supporting our family in a region that was experiencing population loss, so we purchased a small business — the Public Market on Main Street in West Stockbridge. While we have amazing customers and dedicated employees, running a small business is a tremendous challenge.

We struggle with finding employees. The BRTA doesn't serve our little downtown in West Stockbridge, so our employees need a car just to get to work. Talking with folks across the district, staffing and transportation are universal challenges for our local businesses. For example, General Dynamics is hiring 190 workers. As a senator, I would mobilize to ensure that those positions are filled — we cannot afford to lose anymore jobs.

We also struggle with energy. This is the Public Market's biggest monthly expense. I see the promise of investing in renewable energy and green jobs both as an opportunity for economic development and a long-term solution to global warming. We need to make this a priority for our local businesses to stay competitive and so that we can attract new business.

I joined Berkshares, Inc., an organization developing innovative ways to support local businesses, focusing on keeping more dollars here. We teach young people about entrepreneurship, and we are partnering with local banks to create a micro-lending program. Identifying products that businesses in our area can manufacture locally led to the creation of the "Community Supported Industry" program.

My husband and I returned to the Berkshires to raise our children here. Their education is of utmost importance to us. We are concerned by the stress that our teachers, administrators and students are under and we see the decline in population affecting our schools.

As parents we want all of our students to receive high quality, individualized instruction and we worry about the effects of high-stakes testing. I have advocated for a district-wide approach to providing all of our children with the very best education from preschool through college, including high quality after-school, mentoring and vocational programs for our students.

COURTS OFFER INSIGHT

I have spent the last 10 years representing indigent criminal defendants and families across the county and state. As an attorney, I am one of the many people on the front lines of our region's opioid epidemic. Attorneys, police officers, therapists, nurses, and doctors are doing their work without fanfare. There are no awards for convincing a client to take a plea that includes essential treatment instead of going to trial.

My work in the courts has given me insight into the cycle of poverty and addiction afflicting our communities. For example, I noticed a theme among my legal clients — many lived in their grandmother's homes. In many families, that was the last generation with the financial security to buy a home. Substance abuse and crime is a symptom of a larger problem — it is the effect of a long-term economic decline.

My experience has taught me that with a fighting spirit and by working together, we can solve our most difficult problems. It is that spirit — that there is a solution to the effects of long-term economic decline — which I bring to my work every day.

As a senator, I pledge to:

* Bring a drug court to Berkshire County with the goal of shifting funds from incarcerating people to treating them;

* Invest in our transportation infrastructure, high speed Internet, and education so that we all have access to opportunity;

* Support the Berkshire Innovation Center in Pittsfield, to grow the life sciences sector and high tech manufacturing;

* Organize and advocate for state-wide and local approaches to support our local farmers, specialty-foods producers, artists, and entrepreneurs;

* Protect our environment by opposing the pipeline and pushing the state-wide effort to expand alternative energy sources, create more green jobs, and to protect human health from toxic waste in our communities; and,

* Bring more resources to our district through the budgeting process and by equalizing the taxes paid by people earning over a million dollars per year.

I am running because I am the passionate, practical, progressive leader that the four counties need to serve them in the state Senate, and I ask for your vote in the Democratic primary on Sept. 8.

Please contact me to join my campaign and to join me in building a district where all of our children can return to be part of a vibrant, prosperous community.

The author is a candidate for state Senate in the Berkshire, Hampshire, Franklin & Hampden district. To reach Andrea Harrington email andrea@andreaforsenate.com or visit www.andreaforsenate.com for more information or to volunteer.

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April 4, 2016

Re: My new blog page following the Berkshire State Senator race + Pittsfield political phonies

I took out nomination papers to run for Berkshire State Senator in 1998 and 2004, but I never actually ran (against my enemy #1 named Luciforo). I have a new blog page following the Berkshire State Senator race.

Some "Democrats" in Pittsfield politics only say they are "Democrats" because that is where the power is in Massachusetts politics.

If the power structure favored "Republicans", these same phonies would call themselves "Republicans" in Pittsfield politics.

My point is that they don't give "2 cents" about party politics, but rather, they only care about being in favor with the powerful.

My #1 example is one Peter J. Larkin, who is as Republican as Republican can be, but he has always called himself a Democrat. Lobbyist Larkin gets paid very well to do GE's bidding in Pittsfield politics, while thousands of local people continue to suffer from GE's cancer causing PCBs.

My #2 example is Andrea F. Nuciforo, Jr., who is not as Republican as Peter Larkin, but he is a Republican fiscal conservative in favor of Boston area big banks and especially wealthy insurance companies, which he continues to represent as a corporate Attorney in Boston.

As much as I like Rinaldo Del Gallo, III, and I wish him well in his campaign for Berkshire State Senator, his legal writings come across as Republican, especially on social issues dealing with probate and family law. Rinaldo Del Gallo has an unfavorable view of women in family conflict when he supports shared parenting. Like Nuciforo, Rinaldo has a long family history rooted in Pittsfield politics.

- Jonathan Melle

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“State Senate seat contest heating up: Downing’s 52-community district up for grabs includes eight Franklin County towns”
By Richie Davis, Recorder Staff, April 4, 2016

There’s nothing like a vacant seat to attract candidates for election.

And so the only regional campaign that is beginning to heat up is for the state Senate seat being vacated by Benjamin B. Downing of Pittsfield. The 52-community district includes Conway, Shelburne, Buckland, Charlemont, Hawley, Heath, Rowe and Monroe as well as cities and towns in Berkshire, Hampshire and Hampden counties.

There do not yet appear to be challenges for incumbent members of the Franklin County legislative delegation seeking re-election. The deadline for submitting nomination papers to local town clerks is May 3.

In addition to a three-way Democratic race for the Berkshire Senate seat, a Republican candidate is circulating nomination papers, pointing to the likelihood of a general election contest in November.

Pittsfield attorney Rinaldo Del Gallo III has joined Shelburne Falls native Adam Hinds of Pittsfield and Richmond attorney Andrea Harrington in gathering signatures for the Democratic nomination.

Christine Canning of Lanesborough, who owns two educational consulting businesses, Boston Manhattan Group Inc. and New England Global Network LLC, is circulating nomination papers as a Republican.

Hinds and Harrington have both announced their candidacies. Hinds heads the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition and was founding director of Pittsfield Community Connection, emphasizing youth and gang-violence prevention programs.

Harrington is a board member of Berkshares local business and entrepreneurship programs, and is also a Richmond Affordable Housing Committee member.

Del Gallo has not yet formally announced his candidacy. He has been in Berkshire Fatherhood Coalition as a spokesman for the fathers’ rights group and has worked on animal rights and environmental issues, including successfully getting adopted a plastic foam ban in Berkshire County and a Pittsfield farm-animal rights ordinance.

Canning, who has been an education specialist for the U.S. State Department and has worked for the Springfield, Holyoke and Pittsfield public schools, is a doctoral candidate in educational policy and research at the University of Massachusetts.

Democrat Jim White of Templeton, who had sought unsuccesfully to unseat former Rep. Denise Andrews in 2012, said he had seriously considered challenging first-term Rep. Susannah Whipps Lee, D-Athol, in the the Second Franklin House District, but has decided against a run.

The only other legislative district for which there is a contest is for the seat being vacated by Rep. Ellen Story, D-Amherst, with papers being circulated by former Massachusetts Broadband Institute Executive Director Eric T. Nakajima, Viraphanh Douangmany, Solomon Goldstein-Rose, Sarah la Cour, Bonnie MacCracken and Lawrence O’Brien, all of Amherst.

You can reach Richie Davis at rdavis@recorder.com or 413-772-0261, ext. 269.

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Christine Canning, of Lanesborough, promises to shake up the political establishment in Boston if elected to the seat now held by Sen. Benjamin B. Downing, D-Pittsfield, who is not seeking a sixth term. (Jim Therrien — The Berkshire Eagle)

"GOP candidate for Berkshire-area Senate seat promises shakeup in Boston"
By Jim Therrien, The Berkshire Eagle, April 5, 2016

LANESBOROUGH — A Lanesborough woman with a background in education and a history of advocating against wasteful school spending is seeking the Republican nomination for the Berkshire-region Senate district.

Christine Canning, of Noppet Road, also promises to shake up the political establishment in Boston if elected to the seat now held by Sen. Benjamin B. Downing, D-Pittsfield, who is not seeking a sixth term.

"I am running for a multitude of reasons," Canning said in an interview. "No. 1, I see a need for the counties I am representing to improve their educational systems. Right now, I see a lot of corrupt, incestuous and job-embedded practices, where our schools are at Level 3 [in state rankings], some possibly going to Level 4. I see what taxpayers are paying, and I don't feel they are getting value for their money."

Canning said she has been a whistleblower against fraud or regulatory violations concerning funding earmarked for students such as those in English Language Learner or special education programs. She took on the Pittsfield Public Schools while an English teacher at Taconic High School and later reported alleged problems in the Holyoke schools, where she also worked, and in North Adams schools concerning use of ELL funding.

Speaking of the situation in Holyoke, Canning said, "My goal is and always will be as an advocate for children, and when I saw that these people were taking money and promoting their own careers at the expense of these kids who could afford it the least, I couldn't take it. I just started reporting it; just started documenting and reporting. ... And now the state has corrected it."

In Pittsfield, Canning, was a former chairwoman of the Taconic High School English Department when she filed suit against the city and some school officials in 2006, claiming she was improperly fired for repeatedly bringing to the attention of administrators concerns about discrimination, drug use and violence among students.

In 2009, her suit against the city and school officials was settled on the second day of a civil trial in Superior Court.

Of the settlement, Canning said: "I can't discuss a lot of that," but she said her complaints focused on the legal protections for "the health, welfare and safety" of children. She added, "And a lot of people, if you notice, stepped down or were removed."

"In one sense, all of these cases brought me up to realizing how taxpayer money is wasted," she said. "It is not utilized. The levels and practices of corruption, using loopholes, and our inability to check the system. And also because of the nepotism and the good old boy circle that I have found. ... I really felt I am not afraid to take them on, I am not afraid of exposure, and I believe in transparency. And I also think you can do more with less.

"And because I have lived with these loopholes, I know exactly where to look," Canning said. "When you have experienced it yourself, you know exactly how people beat the system."

"I also am very pro-business," she said. "But in order to bring business back into Berkshire County, you need someone who is not just going to say they will listen, but someone who is going to do. And I have a proven track record of doing things."

Canning said that when she realized some state education-related contracts were going to vendors in other states, she decided, "This is crazy."

She said she went to Sen. Downing and suggested what later became the Massachusetts Uniform Procurement Act, which stipulates, "If a Massachusetts company can do the same work as an out of state company, then we have to give them preference."

"I showed him [Downing] what we lost in tax dollars because of this," she said.

Noting the level of poverty and drug use in the region, Canning said, "Because of that, I think if we don't save ourselves now, and go with someone like me who is proven to change things, proven to stand up to people that no one else wants to deal with, then I think Berkshire County really can't hope for more."

The reality today, she said, is that the region is ignored in Boston and "being taken advantage of" by corporate entities like Kinder Morgan, which plans a natural gas pipeline across the county.

"I have worked with people who think the state ends at Worcester," Canning said. "It does not."

She likened the state's allocation of resources to a Monopoly board game in which "you give 90 percent of the properties to from Worcester to Boston and leave us with the other 10 percent, and you see Worcester to Boston getting richer and richer and the rest of the state getting poorer and poorer."

She said of a Kinder Morgan compensation proposal in dealing with property owners along its proposed pipeline route, "They are treating us like the Beverly Hillbillies."

Canning comes by her interest in education naturally. Both her mother and father, John and Kathleen Canning, now retired, had long careers in the field in Berkshire County. Her mother taught languages at St. Joseph High School for many years, and her father is a former principal at Monument Mountain Regional High School in Great Barrington.

Today, she is CEO of New England Global Network, LLC, an education consulting firm, and develops curriculum and educational training manuals, books and other materials, often under state or federal contracts, including for the State Department involving foreign nations.

Canning is a widow. She married Douglas Wilson, a native of Scotland, who died of leukemia in 2003. She said they met while she was working as an English instructor in United Arab Emirates University in 1999, and they were married the following year.

The couple's two children now attend Mount Greylock Regional High School, Canning said.

Canning is completing a doctorate at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst in Educational Policy and Research. She is licensed as a superintendent and holds four professional teaching licenses.

"So I can really work the gamut of where I want in this field," she said.

The 1987 St. Joseph High School graduate said she was Catholic Youth Organization volunteer of the year and won a Rotary Service Above Self Award and was otherwise active in the community.

She holds an English degree from UMass and a master's from West Virginia University in foreign language and linguistics. She also studied at the University of Cambridge, England, Oxford University, England, and Salzburg College in Austria.

Canning said she has been meeting with Berkshire GOP officials as she prepares her campaign and will have a formal announcement in the near future.

Others having announced for the Senate seat, which represents 52 communities in four western counties, are Adam Hinds and Rinaldo Del Gallo of Pittsfield and Andrea Harrington of Richmond. All are seeking the Democratic nomination for the office.

Contact Jim Therrien at 413-496-6347. jtherrien@berkshireeagle.com @BE_therrien on Twitter.

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State Senate candidate Christine M. Canning meets with supporters following her campaign kick-off event Wednesday at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 448 on Wendell Avenue in Pittsfield. (Gillian Jones — The Berkshire Eagle | photos.berkshireeagle.com)

“Lanesborough Republican Canning launches campaign for Massachusetts Senate”
By Phil Demers, The Berkshire Eagle, May 4, 2016

PITTSFIELD - Christine M. Canning called herself a "pit bull but with lipstick" and a "new tributary" who would freshen the waters of Berkshire politics.

Canning, a Lanesborough Republican, formally announced her campaign for the Berkshire-region Senate district at Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 448 on Wednesday.

To an audience of dozens, the candidate touted her tirelessness in fighting for equality of opportunity and sensible policy, her extensive education and knowledge of foreign languages; experience living in the Middle East and her whistleblowing past.

"I have a vision; I want to bring jobs," Canning said. "I've worked around the world, in multiple countries. I've seen growth. For the last 24 years, we've been run by Democrats, and now, we are the 21st poorest county in the United States. That is not acceptable in my mind."

She added, "I will bend over backwards. I don't quit."

USA Today reported Berkshire County as the 21st poorest county in the United States in January 2015, based on median household income and the poverty and unemployment rates.

Canning, 46, also pitched herself as a crossover candidate who Democrats could comfortably vote for — a "doer," not a party follower, more concerned with getting things done than political grandstanding.

"I will guarantee you this: I have a lot of integrity, and if I say I'm going to go in and do it, I will do it," she said. "I'm never tired. People say to me, 'You're like the Energizer Bunny; you keep going and going.' The reason is, I believe in people, and I believe I'm here to serve people.

Canning added, "We have Democrats here tonight."

Naming legislative committees she would seek to work on, Canning identified her areas of expertise: Ways and Means, the Joint Committee on Education, the Joint Committee on Public Safety and Homeland Security, and the Committee on Ethics and Rules.

Brash and gregarious in style, Canning seemed to fit the part she seeks to play. She spoke out against a Democratic bill up for consideration by the Joint Committee on Transportation, seeking to grant illegal immigrants Massachusetts driver's licenses, potentially opening these individuals up to other state services.

Canning said it should not be passed when many veterans remain homeless and in need of services.

State Rep. Tricia Farley-Bouvier, D-Pittsfield, and state Sen. Patricia Jehlen, D-Somerville, filed the bill.

Peter C. Giftos, former executive director of Berkshire County Republican Association, who attended the announcement, called Canning "almost too good to be true."

"She has that rare gumption that I like to see in the political process," Giftos said. "What I like about her, is if she sees something wrong, she'll go after it like a tiger."

Canning, a former Taconic High School teacher, went after Pittsfield Public Schools on racial discrimination issues and later did the same in Holyoke schools.

"If you shut up [about issues], the problems continue," Canning said. "You cannot deny people opportunity."

Also in her career, Canning taught in colleges in the United Arab Emirates and Dubai for 14 years.

What she termed runaway corruption and nepotism in Massachusetts — from small towns to state government — would also be a focus, Canning said.

Canning is CEO of New England Global Network, LLC, an education consulting firm, and develops curriculum and educational training manuals, books and other materials, often under state or federal contracts, including for the State Department involving foreign nations.

Canning's late husband Douglas Wilson died of leukemia in 2003. Canning is raising the couple's two children.

Giftos also identified Canning as "one of those rare Republicans" who can win in liberal Massachusetts, because of her personality, emphasis on accomplishing things and focus on corruption.

"We've had one-party government in Massachusetts for so damn long, that's where the corruption comes from," Giftos said. "If you look at the history of the country, you find that every state that had one-party government has gone bananas, has gone bad."

Canning holds an English degree from UMass and a master's from West Virginia University in foreign language and linguistics. She also studied at the University of Cambridge, England, Oxford University, England, and Salzburg College in Austria.

Those announcing their candidacy for the Democratic nomination for the Senate seat — potentially to become Canning's opponent in November — include Adam Hinds and Rinaldo Del Gallo of Pittsfield and Andrea Harrington of Richmond.

The three could face of in a primary election in September.

Contact Phil Demers at 413-496-6214. pdemers@berkshireeagle.com @BE_PhilD on Twitter.

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21. Berkshire County, Massachusetts

* County median household income, 2009-2013: $48,450
* State median household income, 2009-2013: $66,866
* Poverty rate, 2009-2013: 12.8%
* Unemployment, 2013: 7.1%

Massachusetts residents are some of the nation's wealthiest. Between 2009 and 2013, the state's poorest county had a median annual household income of $48,450, not especially poor compared to other counties reviewed. As in the rest of the state, Berkshire County residents benefited from exceptionally high health insurance coverage. Just 3.3% of residents did not have health insurance over the five years through 2013, one of the best rates nationwide.

Source: "The poorest county in each state" By Thomas C. Frohlich, 24/7 Wall St. via USA Today (online) January 10, 2015.

Link: www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2015/01/10/247-wall-st-poorest-county-each-state/21388095/

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"Attorney Andrea Harrington of Richmond to announce candidacy for state Senate seat"
Daily Hampshire Gazette, March 8, 2016

RICHMOND — Attorney Andrea Harrington of Richmond is scheduled to announce her candidacy Tuesday for the state Senate seat being vacated by Sen. Benjamin B. Downing, D-Pittsfield.

Harrington, a Democrat, is scheduled to announce her candidacy at 10 a.m. at the Public Market in West Stockbridge. The Berkshire, Hampshire, Franklin and Hampden district is made up of 52 towns, including Chesterfield, Cummington, Goshen, Huntington, Middlefield, Plainfield, Westhampton, Williamsburg and Worthington.

“I am running for State Senate because our district needs a leader who understands the challenges facing our communities and will build on the opportunities we have to create jobs and protect our children,” Harrington said in a statement Monday. “I am running to expand the bright spots in our regional economy — in court I have seen too many lives impacted by financial hardship.”

A board member of Berkshares, a local currency for Berkshire County, Harrington’s work with the organization focuses on supporting local business, growing entrepreneurship and the new community-supported industry program.

A mother of two, Harrington also volunteers with programs to provide expanded educational opportunities for young people in Berkshire County — the Railroad Street Youth Project, the Crocus Fund and the Berkshire Academies’ Mentors.

Shelburne Falls native Adam Hinds of Pittsfield also is a candidate for the seat being vacated by Downing after 10 years.

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Adam Hinds of Pittsfield and Andrea Harrington of Richmond are Democratic candidates for the state Senate seat being vacated by Benjamin Downing. (Campaign Photos)

2016 ELECTIONS
"Two Democrats vying for Benjamin Downing's Senate seat field questions at Goshen forum"
By Mary Serreze | Special to The (Springfield) Republican, May 12, 2016

GOSHEN —€” Two Democratic candidates for a seat on the Massachusetts Senate squared off Wednesday night at the Congregational Church in Goshen, fielding questions about education funding, rural broadband, marijuana, and more.

Andrea Harrington and Adam Hinds are vying for the Senate seat being vacated by Benjamin B. Downing of Pittsfield. The Berkshire, Franklin, Hampshire and Hampden district comprises 52 communities in the three western counties.

A declared Republican candidate, Christine Canning of Lanesborough, was not part of the event, hosted by Hilltown Democratic Coalition.

Harrington, 41, is an attorney who lives in Richmond with her husband and children. "I want my kids to be be able to return and live in an area that's prosperous," she said. "I'm a practical, passionate, and progressive leader." The Taconic High School graduate practiced law in Florida before she and her husband, who now owns the Public Market in West Stockbridge, returned to the Berkshires "to make an investment in the community." She emphasized her strong work ethic, and said representing a range of clients in her law practice has given her a valuable perspective.

Hinds, 39, of Pittsfield, grew up in Buckland and attended Mohawk Trail Regional High School, where his father was a teacher and his mother a librarian. He spoke of his decade in the Middle East working for the United Nations as a negotiator in Syria, Jerusalem, and Iraq. "We need a negotiator on Beacon Hill," said Hinds, a graduate of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. Hinds, who founded a program to help at-risk youth in Pittsfield, is now executive director of the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition in North Adams.

Both emphasized the importance of public education, and said state funding formulas put rural, regional school districts at a disadvantage. Hinds said the Hampshire Regional School District loses $200,000 a year because of inadequate transportation reimbursements from the state. "We desperately need Chapter 70 reform," he said, referring to the state school aid program. "I'm passionate about this, coming from an education family."

Harrington said small towns are at a crisis point, struggling to fund education with constrained budgets. "Town and school health care costs are a major factor," she said. "I would support a single-payer system." She said Chapter 70 aid should be "cost-based instead of seat-based" because sprawling rural school districts have high fixed costs per student, including regional transportation.

On the topic of rural broadband, Hinds said stalled deployment by the state is "unacceptable." The state "should focus on what the towns want, and the two sides should not criticize each other's business plan in the press." Hinds was referring to a public conflict that erupted late last year between the Massachusetts Broadband Institute and WiredWest, a cooperative that hopes to own and operate a taxpayer-funded regional fiber network in the hilltowns.

Harrington said broadband is essential in today's world, and that by failing to get behind WiredWest, Governor Charlie Baker "has shown that he does not support coops." She said while some towns have decided to reject WiredWest membership and "go their own way" in building town-owned networks with state support, "the cooperative model makes sense" and "that's what the towns approved."

Neither Harrington nor Hinds expressed support for legalizing marijuana, with each saying drug use at an early age can have long-term adverse affects. Harrington said minorities are over-represented in marijuana-related arrests, and noted that possession is now decriminalized in Massachusetts, but said that a proposed ballot question to tax and legalize marijuana "is a different issue." She said there is no clear way for police to determine if a driver is high on marijuana, and that parents smoking at home could send the wrong message to youth. "We need further study. At this point, I'm opposed," she said.

Hinds said that in his work as a mentor to at-risk youth, he has seen the adverse impact of marijuana. "I have no problem with adults smoking in the privacy of their homes," he said. "But we need to prevent substance use at a young age."

Both expressed an interest in energy issues, with Harrington saying high costs are an impediment to economic development. She said Onyx Specialty Papers in Lee spends $2 million per year on energy, and that "the costs are prohibitive" to new manufacturers looking at the region.

Both said they would support the growth of green jobs and the creative economy.

Downing announced in January that he would not seek a sixth term.

The event was originally slated to be held at Goshen Town Hall, but was moved across the road to the church because a lead paint removal project began May 9 at the municipal building.

Also participating were Patrick J. Cahillane and Kavern Lewis, candidates for Hampshire County Sheriff; and Mary E. Hurley and Jeffrey S. Morneau; Democratic candidates for 8th District Governor's Council.

"With no statewide races this year, these down-ballot contests for open seats will be critical for many voters of the Hilltowns and western Massachusetts," said Elizabeth Bell-Perkins, chair of the Goshen Democratic Town Committee.

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"Senate candidate left out of debate in race to replace Downing"
(Greenfield) Recorder Staff, May 17, 2016

PITTSFIELD — One of three Democratic hopefuls for a state Senate vacancy says he is angry at being left out of a candidate’s forum last week.

Rinaldo Del Gallo III of Pittsfield said he wasn’t even aware of the May 11 debate in Goshen, sponsored by the Hilltown Democratic Coalition, until being called by a newspaper reporter. The other two candidates — Adam Hinds of Pittsfield and Andrea Harrington of Richmond — took part in the forum without Del Gallo, who has not yet officially announced his candidacy.

The district, now represented by Sen. Benjamin B. Downing, who is not seeing re-election, includes Ashfield, Conway, Shelburne, Buckland, Charlemont, Hawley, Heath, Rowe and Monroe as well as communities in Berkshire, Hampshire and Hampden counties.

Hilltown Democratic Coalition Matthew Barron said only announced candidates were invited to the forum at Goshen Congregational Church.

“I think it is unconscionable to host a Democratic debate fully knowing that I would almost certainly be a candidate,” said Del Gallo in a written statement. “Anyone with even a modicum of knowledge of knows that the ‘formal announcement’ is a media event with much fanfare that no candidate would do without.”

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Letter: "Comprehensive response to Pittsfield shootings"
The Berkshire Eagle, 5/26/2016

To the editor:

The escalation in shootings in Pittsfield is deeply disturbing. There have been 30 shooting incidents in the first five months of 2016; the same number for all of last year. I worked to address youth violence in Pittsfield, and getting ahead of this will take comprehensive action from us all.

First, law enforcement must have the resources necessary to get ahead of this. Mayor Tyer's plan for more officers is critical, as is intelligence-sharing and collaboration among regional law enforcement actors.

At the same time, robust community work must be a parallel track. During my time starting the city's Pittsfield Community Connection (PCC) program, we focused on creating effective alternatives to violence. That means mentors, jobs and counseling. During previous shooting incidents, PCC outreach workers, sometimes former gang members themselves, stepped in to try to reduce chances of retaliation. Action on the ground by those with access remains vital.

One of my last actions with PCC was to work with the Pittsfield Police Department to secure the Safe and Successful Youth Initiative grant. It is a grant that will bring almost $5 million in state funds to Pittsfield over 10 years. The program is just starting and works with police and the sheriff's office to target young men aged 17-24 with a history of violence. Participants get mental and behavioral health counseling, a job subsidized by the grant, education assistance and regular contact by PCC outreach workers.

There appears to be a nasty mix of growing drug markets, gangs and available weapons. As state senator, I would work to ensure that communities in the district have the resources they need to keep our streets safe and to preserve the healthy development of all residents.

Adam Hinds, Pittsfield
The writer is a Democratic candidate for state Senate.

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Letter: “Hinds understands, will work for region”
The Berkshire Eagle, 5/27/2016

To the editor:

This September, voters in the Berkshire, Hampshire, Franklin and Hampden districts can make an outstanding choice in supporting Adam Hinds for state Senate.

Recently, Hinds released his plan to create and support a strong regional economy, aimed at helping and encouraging small and medium-sized businesses in our area.

Hinds has a deep understanding of the challenges faced by employers in Western Massachusetts, and he plans to focus on issues essential to attracting and retaining good jobs and great companies, such as last mile broadband and supporting our area's creative sector.

Importantly, he also recognizes that valuable jobs and a healthy economy relate to raising up our schools while keeping down energy costs, and promoting affordable housing while protecting our natural assets. This appreciative and encompassing view of what makes our region great is part of what makes Hinds an incredible choice for the state Senate.

Adam lives right here in Pittsfield and calls the Berkshires his home. He feels passionately about this area and will work hard to make sure our city has a representative in Boston and a strong voice.

I encourage you to visit Adams' website at adamhinds.org to read through his story and proposals. In electing him, we'll not only be getting a qualified senator, but a compelling, experienced, and relatable advocate who is well-prepared to secure Beacon Hill support for our beloved area and its economy. He has my complete support.

Vote for Adam Hinds in the Democratic state primary on Sept. 8.

Laurie Tierney, Pittsfield

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"Four candidates for Sen. Ben Downing's Senate seat qualify for ballot"
By Mary Serreze | Special to The Republican | May 27, 2016

Three Democrats and one Republican candidate for state Senate in the sprawling Berkshire, Hampshire, Franklin and Hampden District have qualified for the ballot, the office of Secretary of State William Galvin confirmed on Friday.

The deadline to submit 300 certified signatures to the secretary of state's elections division is Tuesday, May 31. Candidates must also submit financial interest statements to the State Ethics Commission, and have been enrolled in their respective parties for at least 90 days.

The Senate seat has been held for 10 years by Sen. Benjamin Downing, D-Pittsfield, who announced in January he would not run for re-election.

The Democrats who have qualified for the ballot are attorney Andrea Harrington of Richmond, nonprofit director Adam Hinds of Pittsfield and lawyer Rinaldo Del Gallo III, also of Pittsfield. Christine Canning of Lanesborough, a Republican who runs an education consulting firm, has also qualified.

A fourth Democrat, Thomas Whickam of Lee, has pulled nomination papers but has not yet returned 300 certified signatures, according to Galvin's office.

Harrington and Hinds squared off at a Goshen debate earlier this month, and Del Gallo, a fathers' rights activist who describes himself as a "Bernie Sanders progressive," cried foul because he had not been invited. Debate organizers said Del Gallo was excluded because he had not yet declared his candidacy. Del Gallo later said he plans to formally announce his campaign in Pittsfield on May 31.

Downing was just 24 when entered his first Senate race in 2006, after Sen. Andrea F. Nuciforo Jr., D-Pittsfield, said he would not run again. Downing narrowly defeated former state Rep. Christopher Hodgkins of Lee in the primary, then went on to win the general election in a landslide. Since then, Downing has not faced a competitive election.

Downing chairs the Joint Committee on Telecommunications, Utilities and Energy and the Senate Committee on Redistricting; vice chairs committees on tourism and on audit and oversight; and is a member of the influential Ways and Means Committee.

The district, geographically the largest in the Massachusetts Senate, comprises 52 communities in the four western counties.

Mary Serreze can be reached at mserreze@gmail.com.

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"Rinaldo Del Gallo running for Senate as a 'Sanders progressive'"
Running as a 'Bernie Sanders progressive'
By Jim Therrien, The Berkshire Eagle, May 30, 2016

PITTSFIELD — Democratic primary candidate Rinaldo Del Gallo III wants to make it clear from the start what kind of campaign he will run for the state Senate seat representing Berkshire County.

"My general theme is, I am running as a Bernie Sanders progressive," he said during an interview. "It was one of the first decisions I made. I wanted people to be able to know in an instant what type of platform that I had."

Del Gallo added, "There has been a lot of discussion about what is going to happen with that [Sanders] revolution. It has to be a political revolution, so to speak, that happens throughout our government at the federal and state levels."

The movement of wealth toward the higher-income levels in recent decades is a trend that must be reversed, Del Gallo said, to stabilize the middle class and the poor and revive a sluggish U.S. economy.

"Wages have gone flat. Almost all wealth has gone to the top," he said, citing statistics on income and wealth disparities noted by Sanders in his presidential campaign.

"It is an absolute rigging of our system that is causing the decay of our country, that is causing the collapse of the middle class, which is causing the ranks of the poor to swell and the ranks of the middle class to just disappear," Del Gallo said, adding that crime, drug addiction, infrastructure neglect and other problems are related to a lack of economic opportunity for many.

Del Gallo, 53, of Lenox, is an attorney who grew up in Pittsfield where his uncle, Remo Del Gallo, served as mayor during the 1960s. He is seeking the Democratic nomination for the seat now held by Sen. Benjamin B. Downing, D-Pittsfield, who is stepping down at the close of his fifth term in January.

In the Democratic primary Sept. 8, Del Gallo will face Adam Hinds of Pittsfield and Andrea Harrington of Richmond. Christine Canning of Lanesborough is the lone Republican candidate in her party's primary.

At the state level, Del Gallo said, one focus for him would be promoting a taxing system tilted more toward the middle class. He also would advocate for a $15 minimum wage, solar and wind power generation and other environmental issues; support family leave and universal pre-kindergarten and would strive to be "the most pro-labor person" in the Legislature.

Right now, he said, 33 states have a graduated state income tax, which, like the federal government, has different rates depending on the level of income. "I would like Massachusetts to be the 34th state," he said.

The state now has only one tax rate, "basically a flat tax," he said. The candidate said he believes there are "different types of income that would be taxed differently with different types of approaches," saying that he would research tax issues more before making specific proposals.

Del Gallo contends that, at the federal level, the 1950s and 1960s saw high nominal rates and, "I would submit that those were some of the most economically prosperous times in our county."

Del Gallo said it seems "clear to me that we are going to have to amend our tax policies so that those who are super-affluent, those with the ability to pay, pay. We need a very fundamental change."

Without that level of taxation, he said, "We haven't been able to finance infrastructure, or public education ... But the good thing, at least in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is that this is a taxing opportunity; it is there for us."

He also argues that "government clearly can create wealth," which he said is a basic difference between Democrats and Republicans, who believe the private sector should create wealth and drive the economy. "Then they hop in their car and drive home on a [public] road and pretend that isn't wealth," he said.

Expanding tax revenue sources could help repair crumbling infrastructure, fund education and promote green industries, he said, adding, "But we have been talking about this for decades."

The Obama administration's economic stimulus package was a good idea but "far too small," he said.

"We need money," he said. "We need some return on this enormous amount of wealth and capital that exists in this country ... A lot of people would think this is pie in the sky stuff, but there is a lot of wealth out there that could be reasonably taxed, and in the past when we have done so we have had fantastic economies,"

Raising the minimum wage also would spur the economy, he said, as it would give people more money to spend. Opponents of hiking the wage, "try to pretend progressives are wrong on minimum wage impact, but Harry Truman doubled the minimum wage in 1950s, and we had a booming economy. They want to pretend that the progressives don't know what they are talking about; well, they are just wrong. These are eminently doable things."

Like Sanders, Del Gallo would push for tuition-free college for state residents, arguing that European nations have shown this too is realistic.

Such tax changes would be "saving them [the wealthy] from themselves," he said. "Basically, they are drying up all the wealth. We cannot continue to decimate the middle class ... It's like overfishing a [prime fishing hole]."

Del Gallo said he also is proud of his record on the environment, having sponsored a polystyrene foam container ban ordinance that passed in Pittsfield and proposed a plastic bag ban, which is pending.

He received a Hero of the Ocean award from the state Senate for his efforts on the polystyrene ban.

On economic development, he said the area should continue to push to create industrial employment, along with a creative economy, which he said is not large enough to carry the regional economy alone.

He also called for more optimism that something approaching the days of large-scale GE employment are not gone forever. "We have been far to negative, defeatist," he said, adding that other regions, such as around Albany, N.Y., offer a blueprint for success.

Contact Jim Therrien at 413-496-6247. jtherrien@berkshireeagle.com @BE_therrien on Twitter.

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Rinaldo Del Gallo announces his candidacy for state Senate on Tuesday at Shire City Sanctuary in Pittsfield. (Jim Therrien — The Berkshire Eagle)

"Senate candidate Del Gallo makes formal announcement"
By Jim Therrien, The Berkshire Eagle, 5/31/2016

PITTSFIELD - State Senate candidate Rinaldo Del Gallo held a formal campaign announcement Tuesday at Shire City Sanctuary, promising a progressive agenda in the Legislature and contending his name recognition could give him an edge in the Democratic primary.

Del Gallo faces Adam Hinds of Pittsfield and Andrea Harrington of Richmond for the Democratic nomination. A lone Republican, Christine Canning of Lanesborough, is seeking her party's nomination.

Several supporters attending the evening event praised Del Gallo, 53, a city native and attorney, for his work on behalf of progressive causes — often performing hours of pro bono legal work.

Brad Verter said, "I was inspired by Rinaldo Del Gallo," when Verter began pushing for bans on polystyrene foam containers and shopping bags in Williamstown, both of which were enacted.

Del Gallo's proposal for similar bans in Pittsfield spurred his own, Verter said, adding that he previously hadn't realized such changes could be enacted, before he saw a Del Gallo column on his citywide effort in The Berkshire Eagle.

"He held my hand through the entire process [in Williamstown]," Verter said.

Since then, he said, he has launched MassGreen.org, which assists communities around the state in similar environmental protection efforts.

Jim Martin, who said he has known Del Gallo for many years, said the attorney worked pro bono for numerous hours on a probate court issue for him.

"He has always been more concerned about helping people than making money," Martin said.

Speaking later, Del Gallo estimated he has done "a fantastic amount of pro bono work" over the years in numerous causes.

Martin also praised the candidate for "being the first against the [Kinder Morgan natural gas] pipeline in this county."

Grier Horner, a retired Berkshire Eagle editor and artist, said Del Gallo helped rescue his neighborhood when a developer planned a 375-unit timeshare development nearby. Not seeking any compensation, Del Gallo "knocked the [legal] footing out from under the developers," Horner said.

He also praised the candidate, who has promised to run "as a Bernie Sanders progressive," for his positions on taxation, the environment and many other issues. Through changes in the state and federal tax structures, Del Gallo wants to "ease the stranglehold" wealthy interests have obtained, Horner said.

"We need more candidates like Bernie Sanders and Rinaldo Del Gallo," he said.

Del Gallo stressed his progressive platform, which includes creating a tax structure favorable to the middle class and poor and asks more in taxes from the wealthy. Quoting Sanders during his presidential campaign, he cited statistics showing that the nation had a robust economy in past decades when the tax rates on high earners and wealth were much higher.

"Today, we don't have the money to fund government anymore," he said, later adding, "We can't keep putting it on the [government] credit card."

He also called for a $15 minimum wage and other changes to boost lower-income workers and the poor, contending that would enhance the entire economy as it did during the post-World War II decades.

He also supports tuition-free public higher education and affordable health care for all.

And the candidate said he has shown over the years a willingness to be among the first to take sometimes unpopular views and persevere until others adopt them as well.

He said that was true of his early stand in favor of decriminalizing marijuana and fighting for the rights of fathers with the Berkshire Fatherhood Coalition, and on transgender rights to use public restrooms.

"I think I have a chance in this race," Del Gallo said.

He said he has a long track record of activism and other work in the Berkshires that could give him a name-recognition advantage over his Democratic rivals in the Sept. 8 primary.

Del Gallo said he favors an approach to economic development similar to the stimulus efforts in New York in creating a Nanotechnology Institute in the Albany area.

Del Gallo also talked about growing up in Pittsfield where his uncle, Remo Del Gallo, served as mayor during the 1960s. The elder Del Gallo was among about 30 supporters in attendance Tuesday.

Contact Jim Therrien at 413-496-6247. jtherrien@berkshireeagle.com @BE_therrien on Twitter.

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Rinaldo Del Gallo made his announcement in front of 35 or so supporters at Shire City Sanctuary.

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"Del Gallo Launches Bid For State Senate Seat"
By Andy McKeever, iBerkshires Staff, June 1, 2016

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — Jim Martin had his daughter taken away from him and he didn't have the money to fight for custody in the courts.

Rinaldo Del Gallo offered his legal services pro-bono and put more than 100 hours into the legal representation.

"He is more concerned about justice than he is money," Martin said on Tuesday when Del Gallo formally announced his campaign for the state Senate seat being vacated by Benjamin Downing.

Mark Delmyer has a similar story about Del Gallo helping to fight off developers looking to divvy up his family farm into subdivisions.

"The farm now is still in the midst of being determined but the good news is we have somebody to help," Delmyer said.

Grier Horner told a similar story of when Del Gallo defeated a timeshare project eyed for the Ponterill property. And Brad Verter credited Del Gallo with being his inspiration for the ban of polystyrene and plastic bags in Williamstown, after which Del Gallo lead the successful ban in Pittsfield.

"He held my hand through the entire process," Verter said, adding that he motivated him to ultimately start the statewide Mass Green Network.

There are dozens of stories of Del Gallo's work and his message in the campaign is "you know me."

The attorney has been active in a number of different political and social issues in the area since he returned here in 2000. He started the Berkshire Fatherhood Coalition. He ushered through the ban on polystyrene food containers in Pittsfield, and inspired and worked with other communities to do the same.

"I stuck with it, it took three years and in 2015, the city of Pittsfield banned Styrofoam," Del Gallo said.

He cited a number of small legislative items he got through the Pittsfield City Council and his ongoing petition to ban single-use plastic bags. He's previously filed a petition to support transgender rights.

"So far, I seem to be the only talking about this. I believe transgendered people should have equal rights," Del Gallo said. "If elected to the Senate, I will fight for the rights of transgendered people."

He represented First Amendment cases, including a 2012 suit against local blogger Dan Valenti. And he said he's always had the courage to speak out against such things as supporting the decriminalization of marijuana in 2008 when most officials were opposing it and the Bernard Baran case. Through countless columns and opinion pieces submitted to newspapers, Del Gallo says he has the name recognition and the platform to win the Senate seat.

Dubbing himself a "Bernie Sanders progressive," his primary focus is on income inequality.

"We want to keep the revolution going on the local level," he said.

Crediting Sanders' speeches, he said the top 1/10 of the top 1 percent of the wealthiest Americans have as much wealth as the bottom 90 percent and that the richest 20 people have more wealth than the bottom 150 million people.

That's where the money is to support a number of projects that were never completed, he said, such as high-speed rail to Boston and New York from the Berkshires or a more robust public transportation system or providing tuition-free college.

"I want to introduce a graduated income tax system," Del Gallo said, adding he'd go after making the amendment in the state Constitution to join the 33 other states with such a system.

He also supports raising the minimum wage, adding a millionaire tax, and a wealth tax. That will pave the way for universal preschool and single-payer health insurance.

"This isn't pie in the sky stuff, it's being done all over the world," Del Gallo said.

He also supports GMO labeling, bioremediation of the Housatonic River, opposing the Kinder Morgan pipeline in Otis and Sandisfield, and using the William Stanley Business Park as a place to grow nanotechnology industry as has been done in Albany, N.Y.

"This is just talk unless we can get some of this wealth," Del Gallo said.

He went on to oppose the war on drugs and incarceration — instead calling for more rehabilitation.

Del Gallo took a few shots at his opponents in the Democratic primary, saying Adam Hinds has only been in the Berkshires for a small period of time compared to him and that Andrea Harrington has been "quiet" while he's been active in the community. Del Gallo hopes to defeat those two in the September primary to win the Democratic nomination. From there he'd be up against Christine Canning, of Lanesborough, who is the Republican candidate.

Del Gallo is a Pittsfield native and his uncle Remo Del Gallo was Pittsfield's mayor in the 1960s. His father was a cost engineer at General Electric. Rinaldo Del Gallo got his law degree from George Washington University.

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Grier Horner voiced support for Del Gallo not just because of his local work but also because of the national and state issues in which the two share the same views.

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"Third Democrat [Rinaldo Del Gallo III] announces formally for Downing’s Senate seat"
By Richie Davis, Recorder Staff, June 2, 2016

A third Democratic hopeful seeking a Berkshire County-based state Senate seat has formally announced his candidacy.

Rinaldo Del Gallo III, who is an attorney, is seeking the Senate seat being vacated by Democrat Benjamin Downing of Pittsfield, and faces a three-way Democratic primary on Sept. 8 in the district that includes Ashfield, Conway, Shelburne, Buckland, Charlemont, Hawley, Heath, Rowe and Monroe, along with communities in Berkshire, Hampshire and Hampden counties.

Del Gallo, who describes himself as “a Bernie Sanders progressive,” is the last of the three Democrats to formally announce, and was critical of being left out of a May 11 debate the Hilltown Democratic Coalition held in Goshen, although organizers said it was only for announced candidates. Democrats Adam Hinds of Pittsfield and Andrea Harrington of Richmond took part.

A graduate of George Washington University Law School and Northeastern University, Del Gallo has been spokesman for the Berkshire Fatherhood Coalition since 2002 and has worked on animal rights and environmental issues, including successfully getting adopted a plastic foam ban in Berkshire County and a Pittsfield farm-animal rights ordinance. Del Gallo says we would support a statewide ban on single-use plastic bags and plastic foam products like Styrofoam.

He has filed a petition in Pittsfield to guarantee the rights of transgendered people and, as a lawyer, wrote a legal opinion that helped prevent time-share housing from being allowed in residential zones in the city.

Del Gallo supports “tuition-free and debt-free” state higher education as well as universal pre-kindergarten, to be sponsored by a millionaire’s tax now being considered as a state constitutional amendment. He also supports decriminalization of marijuana, a $15 minimum wage and labeling of genetically modified organisms.

He has a been an op-ed contributor to the Berkshire Eagle on a wide variety of subject and has written a My Turn column on Styrofoam for The Recorder.

You can reach Richie Davis at rdavis@recorder.com or 413-772-0261, ext. 269.

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Christine Canning: “Why I am running for state Senate”
By Christine Canning, Op-Ed, The Berkshire Eagle, 6/12/2016

LANESBOROUGH - I was born and raised in Berkshire County but have either lived or worked in Hampden, Hampshire and Franklin counties over the years. I understand our area, its people, and our needs. I am highly educated, personable, demonstrate common sense, and address adversity without blinking an eye.

I am running because I can no longer watch us spiral deeper down with the nepotism, corruption, retribution and retaliation of "good old boys" networks that centralize the power at our people's expense. I am a strong person who is known for her follow through, commitment to causes, and determination to do what is correct, even at the expense of myself. If you wish to discuss my platform more in depth, contact me and I will discuss issues with your organization or group.

We live in a world where private companies play a pivotal role in economic growth and expansion. I want to encourage tax free zones because of the profits that result in other areas of the markets. During my years in the United Arab Emirates, I watched a desert turn green from open-minded innovation. I saw how businesses were invited into the region after the turnover of Hong Kong from British rule to China's. I saw Dubai grow, and the people become richer through "free zones" with the money made off of tax breaks.

I firmly believe that private companies grow the economy. As I have owned an LLC and a corporation in the commonwealth with SDO certification that have earned government contracts, I understand first hand the constraints. This is why I worked with Sen. Downing to pass an Amended Procurement Act after I realized we were losing our tax dollars to out-of-state companies.

If elected senator, I would use guerrilla marketing tactics to make our region a destination, and not just a place to visit. My work around the world has afforded me first-hand opportunities to see what can work on even the smallest of resources and budgets.

I like reading cutting edge research, trends, and being ahead of the game. The new wave will be artificial intelligence, and I'd like to make it lucrative for companies to make their base in our four-county district. I advocate resilience coupled with reinventions, so we are utilizing what is available to us by law, regulation and funding in this digital age.

Good enough is never good enough with me, because the world is constantly changing, and to keep up at a global level towns either decide to be flexible or face the consequences. You would not wear your 1970s clothes today, yet we are willing to live in a world that no longer exists.

If elected, I am going to work for a much-needed makeover by being candid, engaging in deep and rich discussions, and tweaking laws so that equity rules and not corruption. With my advanced degrees, I am able to deconstruct data to reshape areas that need improvement. Looking at successful models, I am able to make educated comparisons, and will work toward getting our people retrained in fields that offer better salaries and benefits.

In our modern world, each of us bares witness to new ideas, accelerated change, but it is difficult when our areas don't have the tools. This is why I will fight for broadband, and be bold enough to look at technologies that may surpass this service so that we stay ahead of the game as a future flagship to replicate. I want to reshape the area so we can have a business without borders, and emerge stronger by meeting the demands of supply opportunities.

As a professionally licensed teacher in four areas who is also a licensed superintendent of schools, I won't be pontificating from theories but from first-hand practice. Until our schools are up to par, property values will not rise. Many people buy at higher rates in areas with better schools. As I understand formulas, am finishing a doctorate in leadership and policy with a focus in compliance law to better equity, I will hold the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and its vendors accountable.

I will work to change our current standardized testing practice with new alternatives which meet federal mandates and cut back on the $125 million-plus payouts to testing vendors and third parties. Education has become a business, and the only one losing are the students. I have taken on different school districts to protect the health, welfare, and safety of children, and I won't stop, until I see improvements.

Lastly, my work has afforded me to live with the Taliban in Saniya, to go to the 38th parallel, train militaries and work with agents in international law enforcement through language-based opportunities. I have not been protected, or sheltered, but instead immersed myself in the cultures. I have also filed cases with our immigration system and other federal agencies, only to realize how broken the system is and where the loopholes lay. My first-hand knowledge alone in these areas make me a valuable servant for the public.

As a previous winner of the DAR, volunteer awards, service above self, and prestigious grants, I would be an excellent senator to serve on our state's committees for education, ways and means and Public Safety. I hope that Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden and Hampshire counties elect me as the incoming state senator this November.

Christine Canning is a Republican candidate for state senator.

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Rinaldo Del Gallo, III: “Open challenges to candidates for state Senate”
By Rinaldo Del Gallo, III, Op-Ed, The Berkshire Eagle, 6/22/2016

PITTSFIELD - In the first week of April, I sent my fellow candidates for state Senate an e-mail asking them to agree to voluntary spending limits. Many progressives I have spoken to feel it is an excellent idea. I herein resubmit an open proposal on the subjects of spending limits, debates and columns in local papers. This offer, previously submitted in early April, I offer for 10 days after publication of this column by The Eagle.

SPENDING LIMITS

I have been told that state Senator Ben Downing spent $100,000 to get elected when he first ran for office in 2006. I also confirmed that former state Senator Andrea Nuciforo spent a similar amount.

Please ponder that colossal dollar figure — $100,000. It is this daunting amount of money that caused me to hesitate about throwing my hat into the ring.

There are several problems with raising such an astronomical sum to run for office.

First, potentially good candidates are not entering the race. Second, when we raise such vast amounts of money, we owe people favors. Politics becomes less about people and more about campaign donors, especially large campaign donors. We all want to represent the poor and the diminishing middle class — not just people that can make campaign donations.

I am campaigning as a "Bernie Sanders progressive." Bernie has talked at great length about the evils of money and politics. It is my hope that getting money out of politics is something that all of us as Democrats can agree is not only a laudable goal but is essential to the body politic. If our government is going to be what Lincoln described as being "of the people, by the people, for the people," we need to get money out of politics. This is especially true of a state Senate race that should be all about personal conversations, debates, and expression of views in local media.

Third, I want to spend from now until Thursday, Sept. 8, looking voters in the eye and having real conversations, not raising campaign donations. It represents too much of a theft of time. Politics should be about time with people, not raising money.

I propose a limit of around $20,000 but would entertain and even prefer lower amounts. I would entertain higher ones if my fellow candidates would not agree to a $20,000 campaign spending limit. But I want to know if you will agree to any campaign spending limits of any kind or nature. It is the first policy decision you will have to make.

Here would be the parameters:

* Democratic state Senate candidates Adam Hinds and Andrea Harrington, would have to agree for this proposal to apply to the Democratic primary.

* There would be a limit on campaign contributions, but there would also be a limit on "independent" expenditures. Good faith efforts would have to be made to discourage such expenditures. The purpose would be to remove hard money and soft money.

* We could agree to raise funds for the general campaign should the Republican challenger, Christine Canning, not agree to this agreement. If the Republican does not agree to these terms, it would enhance the Democrats' chance at victory, since we would not expend money fighting each other in our primary.

* If I can get all other candidates on board that could appear in the general election, this agreement of spending limits would apply to the general election as well.

I believe that we as Democrats can make history and return democracy (with the little "d") to the people. Please join me in what could be a historic moment for democracy and its return to the people.

DEBATES

I would like to have debates or forums once per week until the election. There are numerous local organizations that would like to sponsor such debates and forums, and I am sure the media would cover them. I ask the other candidates to agree to this offer.

COLUMNS

We would agree to ask to have local newspapers carry columns by all of us.

While I believe that we have a good pair of Democratic candidates in Hinds and Harrington, this open letter is extended to the Republican challenger, Canning.

Please accept this challenge in the respectful and positive manner in which it is made. Let us change the face of democracy and give it back to the people.

Rinaldo Del Gallo, III is a candidate for state Senate for the Western district comprising 52 towns.

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Letter: “Improving education critical to region”
The Berkshire Eagle, 7/6/2016

To the editor:

I come from a family of educators. My father was a public school teacher and my mother a librarian in the public high school I attended. Public education prepared me for the world, and I am running for state Senate to protect that opportunity for every child in the Western Mass. district.

Towns now finalize budgets in challenging financial circumstances, forcing difficult choices related to school budgets. This past week I released my education priorities with a focus on bolstering schools by fixing funding.

First, update the Chapter 70 funding formula. In Western Mass, we face declining populations and aging infrastructure. So while "dollars follow the student" in the current funding formula, districts with declining populations still must care for aging school buildings, retiree health insurance, and other essential costs. The current formula is woefully outdated and underfunds retiree benefits and special education. I will go to Beacon Hill to fight for a fair solution for our region.

Second, even if we fix the school funding formula, we face the reality of declining populations and dwindling tax dollars. We can expand our high-quality education by allowing neighboring districts to partner and pool knowledge and resources. I will ensure necessary resources are available, and prioritize facilitating and working with all stakeholders to find sensible collaboration in the district.

Third, fully fund regional school transportation. Boston broke its promise to reimburse regional school transportation costs. Limited funds to educate our children now pay for buses.

Governor Baker's proposed FY17 budget only reimburses 68% of the cost. This unfairly impacts school districts in western Massachusetts. I will work tirelessly to get full reimbursement for regional school transportation.

Besides funding priorities, we must ensure our system of education serves everyone. I will work for universal pre-K to address the achievement gap.

Connecting schools to regional workforce needs is another priority. It includes the training needs of local businesses and pre-apprenticeship programs to bring non-traditional workers to the trades. Finally, schools increasingly need the tools to address student emotional and behavioral issues.

Education is at the center of who we are: it reflects our investment in the next generation. Successful pre-K-12 education is central to workforce development and retaining and attracting residents. As state senator, strengthening education will be central to my work.

Adam Hinds, Pittsfield
Adam Hinds is a candidate for state Senate in the Berkshire, Hampshire, Franklin & Hampden district.

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“Impressed by Hinds' focus on education”
The Berkshire Eagle, Letter to the Editor, 7/10/2016

To the editor:

I find Adam Hinds' approach to educational reform enlightening, from his early approach for Pre-K students to his addressing the social and emotional needs of youth. As a School Committee member, I support Adam because of his forward thinking and strong interest in our students' future.

Adam is in tune with the education needs of the districts he is looking to serve. He has many proactive approaches to assist districts as Western Massachusetts faces a declining student population and aging infrastructure. The area needs Chapter 70 formula revisions so the districts receive reimbursements that are equitable and necessary to sustain programs. Regional school transportation formulas need revamping because the districts cannot sustain their costs on 68-70 percent reimbursement at best.

Collaboration will be a tool that educators in Western Massachusetts must look at to become more efficient and sustain services. Workforce programs and funding will be needed to prepare students who are not college bound. Our students today live complicated lives that include peer relationships, social media and pressure to exceed expectations and perform at a high academic level. Partnerships need to be formed and stakeholders need to work together with a leader like Hinds.

The schools cannot do this alone, they need someone who is proactive and believes in our students and providing quality education to our students. Please join me in support of Adam Hinds for state senator.

Regina A. Hill, Adams

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Letter: "Hinds' platform on education is impressive"
The Berkshire Eagle, 7/12/2016

To the editor:

I hold education very close to my heart. It's what we all have in common, and has the greatest potential to make the greatest impact on who our children grow up to become.

Adam Hinds' platform on education impresses me, and this is why I support him. He doesn't simply speak in generic phrases and buzzwords we've all heard; he tries to help all people understand, and that's what we need. He knows that part of the state isn't treated equally on Beacon Hill and the antiquated funding formulas don't look upon our school districts fairly, which is why he wants to update the formulas to fit our communities better in western Massachusetts.

Adam believes that the next state Senator should work to coordinate among districts to save money on some types of costly services and by doing so, our dollars spent on education can become even more effective. He believes every young child is entitled to pre-kindergarten, which research shows is particularly important to adolescent development.

What has impressed me the most is that Adam always stresses the need for our education programs to lead to well-paying jobs. Every student should have the chance to attend college if they wish, but not every student wants to take that path. That's okay. What every student deserves is an opportunity for gainful employment.

Our next state Senator will have to work with the Legislatures to find the funds we need to support our school districts, teachers and para-professionals. Adam has the experience and ideas necessary to follow through and make it happen!

I hope everyone will vote for Adams Hinds in the primary on Sept. 8.

Mary Shook
Pittsfield

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On the trail: Berkshire campaigns in brief
The Berkshire Eagle, 7/9/2016

“Harrington campaign kicks off 'House Party Tour'”

RICHMOND - Andrea Harrington, a Democratic candidate for state Senate, has is planning a "Four County House Party Tour," beginning Tuesday in Great Barrington.

Harrington is running for Senate in the Berkshire, Hampshire, Franklin and Hampden District being vacated by Sen. Benjamin B. Downing.

The tour will consist of 30 individual campaign house parties and meet and greets across the four counties.

"I'm proud of the true district-wide campaign we are running. From Williamstown to Westhampton and Pittsfield to Peru, we are talking to voters and doing grassroots organizing in every corner of the district," Harrington said.

She added, "I am running for state Senate to be a bold, progressive voice for Western Massachusetts, and I look forward to working with residents across the district on the issues that matter to us. I will be a tireless advocate for our communities as we work to combat the opioid epidemic, invest in public education, and develop comprehensive strategies to promote environmental sustainability and create jobs for our region."

Harrington grew up in Richmond where she lives with her husband, Tim, and their two sons. Harrington is an attorney and owns a small business in West Stockbridge.

If interested in attending a house party near you, email casey@andreaforsenate.com.

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Letter: “Andrea Harrington will fight for Senate district”
The Berkshire Eagle, 8/4/2016

To the editor:

If you have not heard of Andrea Harrington, you soon will. She is running for state senator for the 52-community Berkshire-Franklin-Hampshire-Hampden district and she deserves your vote.

I had the opportunity to get to know Attorney Harrington as she represented a beloved family member of mine with a troubling legal matter. Despite her diminutive appearance, we soon learned that this mother of two from Richmond was a spirited fighter.

Andrea provided the strength of professional resolve along with an unwavering action plan, all the while tempered with bundles of warm-hearted optimism. Unselfishly working for little more than goodwill, Attorney Harrington delivered a successful outcome.

Andrea has and continues to serve her family and community tirelessly. She has said that she is running because our district needs a state senator who is invested in this district. Certainly, deep local roots and strong family values define her character.

Much like our brave military men and women, Andrea Harrington seeks to serve to help fulfill those goals. Indeed, as our senator, we can be assured of her unflappable loyalty and determination.

Creating positive change for the western district will take time and energy, but I strongly believe that Andrea is the right person to fulfill the Senate position. She has a proven record of success. She is committed, enthusiastic, professional and a person of integrity, honor, and grace.

On Sept. 8, I strongly encourage you to vote for Andrea Harrington in the Democratic primary. I believe she has earned the opportunity to serve and represent our interests.

Gene DiNicola, Dalton

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Rinaldo Del Gallo, III: “The race's true progressive”
By Rinaldo Del Gallo, III, Op-Ed, The Berkshire Eagle, 8/7/2016

PITTSFIELD - I am running for state senator as a Bernie Sanders progressive. Whenever you hear Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren or I speak at length, our speeches invariably start on the subject of wealth disparity. It is the first issue on Sanders' website. By contrast, I have never heard my two Democratic opponents use the term "wealth disparity," "wealth inequality," or otherwise significantly address the topic.

America is not a poor country. Nor is Massachusetts a poor state. When our friends and neighbors who are barely keeping their heads above water surround us, it creates the illusion of scarcity. It is just that, an illusion. The reality is that we actually live in one of the wealthiest countries in world history. The belief in this reality of grotesque wealth disparity is one of the most fundamental premises of the Sanders revolution — that the rich are becoming richer under a rigged system, and the middle class are joining the ranks of the poor in a period of unprecedented superabundance. Many places throughout the district, by way of example Pittsfield, North Adams and Adams, have seen staggering economic decline in the last 35 years.

As Sanders points out, in America, the top 1/10 of the top 1 percent of the population has as much wealth as the bottom 90 percent. The top 20 people in our country own more wealth than the bottom 150 million Americans, almost ½ of our population. Despite having the most productive workers in the world, our wages have gone flat while almost all new economic growth is siphoned off by the wealthiest.

My opponents would rather remain "on topic" and discuss things like the economy and funding education. They fail to see the incredible nexus. The most prosperous years in America history were the 1950s and early 1960s. Yet, during those years, the highest federal nominal income tax rate was 91 percent! (Go to DelGalloForStateSenate.com for a greater breakdown.) Today, the highest nominal tax rate is only 39.6 percent.

The data are clear: high taxes on the super rich not only do not correspond to economic collapse, but also actually correspond to economic prosperity. Why? Because in the halcyon '50s and early '60s, we were able to make major investments in infrastructure and fund education through taxes on the wealthy. Many do not know that higher education at state schools was once quite affordable because government had the revenue to pay most of the tab.

INVESTMENT NECESSARY

I am running on a platform of single-payer health care; universal pre-K; tuition free and debt-free state higher education; investment in green energy to replace fossil fuels and creating jobs in the Berkshires around that technology; investing in high speed rail from the Berkshires to New York and Boston and improved public transportation to get us out of cars; improving our infrastructure; investing in a technological center like the Albany Nanotech Institute that performed economic wonders, and getting that "last mile" of high speed internet in the hill towns.

Many politicians in the past have campaigned on many of these proposals, yet we never seem to have the money to fund them. This underscores the basic need to have systemic change in our tax system so that we can access this great concentrated wealth to make these programs possible.

My two opponents are not progressive enough. Both started their campaigns by being undecided (when asked by WAMC) about the proposed pipelines that would carry fracked gas through the Berkshires, and only became opposed after I entered the race.

To their credit, both say they support a $15 minimum wage and the "fair share amendment" (which would tack on another 4 percent income tax for incomes over a million dollars.) But one hopped in the race in early February, the other in early March, and yet to the best of my recollection neither said they supported a $15 minimum wage or the fair share amendment until we met in a forum on June 21 and they had to respond to a question. That's after campaigning for four to five months.

My opponents refused to agree to my call for voluntary campaign spending limits. They do not see how good people are becoming discouraged from running for office as fundraising becomes a preoccupation of races, and creates the opportunity for undue influence. They say they are for campaign finance reform, just not in their race.

As a Bernie Sanders progressive, I have been unequivocal in my opposition to the pipelines, I support voluntary spending limits and real campaign finance reform, and the central premise of my campaign is addressing wealth inequality to finance progressive change.

Rinaldo Del Gallo, III is a Democratic candidate for state Senate from the Western District.

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August 7, 2016

Open letter to Rinaldo

Dear Rinaldo,

I read your most recent op-ed about being a true economic/financial progressive in your campaign for Berkshire County State Senator. Your fiscal positions match those of the populist leaders U.S. Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.

In my years of studying and trying to understand economics and finance, there are two significant points to building an equitable society for poor, working and middle class families. The first point is for someone like you who is running for political office is to get the public and private sectors to “Invest in people”. The second point is bring transformation or real change to “the vested interests” that shape the political agenda in local, state, and federal government.

Point 1: The people are the most important resource to a community, state, and nation. The only way to build this resource is for business and government entities to use part of their financial resources to invest in their citizens or customers.

It is not enough to change the tax code from a regressive to a progressive one. It is not enough to raise the minimum wage to $15 per hour. It is not enough to have a single-payer healthcare insurance system, which our nation does not yet have. Those are all good ideas!

We need to do more than change a few public policies. We need to ensure that the poor, working and middle class people are given the resources to achieve an opportunity for financial success via a fair political system that funds programs that invest in their lives. We need middle class and affordable housing, quality public schools in all communities (rich or poor), healthcare insurance that everyone can access, safe streets free of violent crime, financial security through living wage jobs, safe retirement accounts, and the solid foundations of Medicaid, Medicare, and Social Security.

Point 2: Changing the vested interests that set the political agenda is the tougher of the two points to bring an equitable society for the common person. Usually in business and politics, the vested interests always win, while the masses usually lose. The reason is that the vested interests control the government that is supposed to represent the people.

In Massachusetts, and New England, the financial institutions dominate the region’s economy. When U.S. Senator John Forbes Kerry ran against U.S. President George Walker Bush in 2004, I read that it was really big banks versus big oil, but either way “Skull and Bones” would be represented in the White House for the next 4 years.

The irony for Berkshire County and many other areas of Massachusetts is that Boston’s big banks and wealthy insurance companies are not part of these communities. Pittsfield already had a Berkshire State Senator working both for the state government and the financial institutions, but Nuciforo had to step down from the State Senate one decade ago for his corrupt and illegal conflicts of interest.

Changing the vested interests’ political agenda in Massachusetts politics could actually help places like Berkshire County. The vested interests could go from advocating for their business interests to funding programs that invest in people.

Good luck! I am rooting for you, as I did in 2003 when I lived in Pittsfield and listened to you run for local political office 13 years ago. Back then, I believed that your platform of bringing living wage jobs to Pittsfield instead of the WHEN movement that failed Pittsfield’s tanked local economy would have helped matters.

Sincerely,
Jonathan Melle

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"Three Democratic candidates for Downing's seat try to separate themselves ahead of primary"
By Derek Gentile, The Berkshire Eagle, 8/7/2016

LENOX — The three candidates for an open state Senator's seat spent Sunday morning in front of about 40 voters trying to create separation between each other at a "debate" at the Lenox Town Hall.

The event was sponsored by the Lenox Chamber of Commerce and the Lenox Democratic Committee.

The three Democrats are Rinaldo Del Gallo and Adam Hinds both of Pittsfield, and Andrea Harrington of West Stockbridge.

State Representative William "Smitty" Pignatelli moderated.

Pignatelli pointed out that, with the decision by incumbent state Sen. Benjamin Downing not to run for re-election, "this is the first time in 10 years that this seat is open."

Pignatelli added that while there is considerable emphasis on the national election in November, "you have a decision to make in six weeks. The Democratic primary is Sept. 8, a Thursday. And that's an important date."

The district which Downing represents is the largest in Massachusetts, said Pignatelli, encompassing 52 cities and towns.

The event was less a debate than a discussion. The candidates were all asked the same questions and asked to respond. They were also each allowed a preliminary statement and a post-discussion statement.

In overall philosophy, the three candidates were similar. There was some nuance to each response, certainly. Del Gallo emphasized several times that he was a Progressive and follower of former presidential candidate Bernie Sanders.

Harrington said she would work to move the state in a more Progressive direction, while Hinds seemed more moderate.

All emphasized, for example, that they favored a thorough cleanup of the Housatonic River by General Electric.

All three also agreed that broadband access was crucial to the Berkshires, and Hinds and Harrington both noted that the delay in funding a broadband initiative was "shameful."

Del Gallo did not disagree, but pointed out that outlying towns would probably do better to fund at least a portion of the cost of initiating broadband infrastructure themselves than waiting for the state to do so.

The three candidates were all opposed to introducing more charter schools in the area.

"No one," said Harrington, "is clamoring for charter schools."

"We have school districts struggling for funding," said Hinds. He added that the state's "one size fits all" funding formula did not serve school districts in Western Massachusetts.

Del Gallo was not opposed to lifting a cap on the number of area charter schools, but emphasized he would also request that if a cap were lifted, that local school districts should decide whether to add charter schools.

The candidates supported Attorney General Maura Healey's recent decision to ban "copycat" assault weapons.

"I feel obligated to protect our children and ourselves," said Harrington. "It's not about taking away guns from sportsmen."

"These are weapons of war," said Hinds.

Del Gallo said he believed Healy did a "wise thing" in banning the weapons.

Regarding the opioid epidemic, Hinds opined that more resources were needed to deal with intervention, treatment and harm reduction. Harrington agreed, emphasizing that the district has not been granted the funds to deal with the epidemic.

Del Gallo believed that "the state has a lousy attitude toward relapse" believing that more money should be allocated to that effort.

Contact Derek Gentile at 413-496-6251. dgentile@berkshireeagle.com @DerekGentile on Twitter.

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"Democratic House and Senate hopefuls face off in Berkshire Brigades debates"
By Jim Therrien, The Berkshire Eagle, 8/12/2016

PITTSFIELD — The five Democratic candidates seeking legislative nominations in the Sept. 8 primary participated in wide-ranging candidate debates Thursday evening at Berkshire Community College.

The Senate debate, moderated by former Judge Fredric Rutberg, president of The Berkshire Eagle, included numerous questions, follow-up questions and candidate-to-candidate questions.

Del Gallo claimed the "Bernie Sanders progressive" mantle, saying he is running a Sanders-style campaign and stressing strong measures to close the income gap with tax reform to shift the burden more toward the wealthy.

He also several times asserted that he was the first of the three candidates out front on such issues as opposition to the proposed Kinder Morgan natural gas pipeline project that was dropped amid strong opposition, and to support a $15 minimum wage.

Harrington and Hinds disputed that claim, saying they also early on took the progressive stand on those issues.

Del Gallo also asserted that he has been "a visible member of the community for 15 years," advocating for causes like a ban on polystyrene in Pittsfield and writing numerous newspaper columns on a range of progressive subjects. He added that Hinds only recently returned to the area to accept a position in Pittsfield and Harrington has not been "visible" on the political scene.

Hinds, a Buckland native, said he has been directly working in the community and tackling tough issues like gang violence and drugs as the founder of the grant-funded Pittsfield Community Connection program for at-risk youth and later as the executive director of the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition in North Adams.

He also cited his work with the U.N. in the Middle East where he said he learned to work with communities toward collaboration while also encountering negotiators "with some tough actors."

Harrington described herself as someone who has "always been for the underdog" and said she'd be a tireless advocate for working families, which she said are increasingly unable to afford to live in the Berkshires and get ahead.

She promised to pursue "a progressive agenda" in the Senate and added, "I am not a politically connected person, but what I am is a fighter. Don't let my size or my gender fool you," said Harrington, who is slight of build.

The candidate said her work as an attorney and her experiences growing up in a working class family in Pittsfield have given her the ability to forge collaborations but also the insight to know when to stand up strongly in opposition.

Hinds said the Senate position "needs someone to be effective in pushing an agenda," saying his experiences growing up in a family that stressed education, his local work with youth the low-income residents, with the U.N. and working for former U.S. Rep. John Olver, D-Amherst, has prepared him for the job.

Del Gallo said in his closing remarks that "I am the anti-establishment candidate, no doubt about it." But he asserted that more than his opponents he has been out in the community and active for more than a decade and he would fight hard against income disparity, which he said is at the root of many other problems.

"You need someone with fire in his gut," he said.

In November, the winner will face Christine Canning of Lanesborough, who is running unopposed as the Republican candidate.

The debates were held in the Koussevitzky Arts Center at BCC and were recorded by Pittsfield Community Television. Rutberg noted prior the Senate debate that despite a Red Sox-Yankees game and the Olympics on TV, the room was packed, indicating that democracy was alive and well.

Contact Jim Therrien at 413-496-6247.

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Letter: “Hinds shows strength on energy issues”
The Berkshire Eagle, 8/12/2016

To the editor:

The Eagle provides the best coverage in the state on energy and environment issues generally, the policy debates specific to Massachusetts and legislation on Beacon Hill. Beyond the excellence of reporting, one reason may be our region has a gerrymandered division of electric utility territories and high service costs. Another is our intimate knowledge of the costs to the environment from PCBs used in electricity distribution equipment.

Certainly one long ongoing story is that the Berkshires with neighboring hill towns of Franklin and Hampshire counties have long been the state's nursery for clean energy policy and environmental advocacy. The current slate of legislators and those who have represented the region over the last three decades have supported and often created progressive programs and regulation.

As a clean energy employer located in Adams, Berkshire Photovoltaic Services has seen close-up how policy details affect job creation and security. We will miss the steadfast vision of state Sen. Downing on clean energy programs such as those that support internships from BCC and MCLA, and his granular attention to obscure regulations such as those that now ensure fair net metering for early adopters of solar PV systems and owners of small PV systems.

All the state Senate candidates on the Democratic side have expressed support for clean energy and they all should be commended for their interest in public service.

We are urging our customers and your readers to support Adam Hinds on Sept. 8. He is ready to put in the long hours being the First District's state senator require, and he has shown in reaching out to our business and others a command of the complex details on our energy mix. He understands the true costs of a heavy reliance on fossil fuels, the benefits of encouraging renewables and demonstrates the wisdom to achieve the balanced results Sen. Downing has worked hard to preserve and improve.

Christopher Derby Kilfoyle, Adams
The writer is president, Berkshire Photovoltaic Services.

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Adam Hinds: “A vision for Western Massachusetts”
By Adam Hinds, Op-Ed, The Berkshire Eagle, 7/31/2016

PITTSFIELD - Six months ago I began a campaign to be your next state senator because I believe in the extraordinary potential of this region. I remain inspired by our amazing story here in the Berkshire, Hampshire, Franklin and Hampden district. We come from a strong manufacturing legacy that has brought, and continues to bring, critical infrastructure and cutting edge technology to the rest of the world. We have world-class cultural institutions, vibrant cities, welcoming small towns, and unequaled access to nature.

People throughout the district share the character and concerns of the people who surrounded me as I grew up in the small town of Buckland. We believe in basic fairness and are eager to work hard to ensure a bright future for our families.

That is what this campaign is about. It is about ensuring every working family feels secure about the future because they have a quality job in a strong economy, and their child has a first rate education. It is about overcoming decades of wage stagnation and population decline by working toward a vision for the region that inspires others to join.

As your next state senator, my top priority will be to ensure economic growth by supporting existing businesses while advocating for an environment where entrepreneurship thrives. To do this, we must improve our transportation systems and ensure access to high speed internet in every corner of the district. It is unacceptable that finalizing last mile broadband has taken this long.

We must also support our educational institutions and workforce training programs so they can meet the changing needs of our business community. With over 2,000 unfilled jobs in this region, this link puts people to work.

As the son of two public school educators, I grew up understanding the importance of a quality education. I was lucky to receive that just over the hill in the Mohawk Trail Regional School district, where both my parents worked. In Boston, I will fight for an education system that is responsibly funded across the commonwealth, not just in Boston.

I will prioritize closing the opportunity gap by supporting universal Pre-K and full-day kindergarten to help students read proficiently by third grade — a significant measure of future success. I will be a tireless advocate for changing broken funding mechanisms that fail to recognize the challenges of our rural region. It will also be my guiding mission to ensure a college education is available to all who desire one. We cannot allow the cost of higher education to deter anyone from continuing to learn and grow.

SERIOUS ON ENERGY

I will work in the trenches with business and energy leaders, and then with Senate colleagues, to find real solutions to meet clean energy and greenhouse gas reduction mandates while also reducing the burden of rising costs. We have to get serious about deploying new energy solutions. Utility bills should not hinder business growth. We should set an example by pushing forward the clean energy solutions that will make us a leader in protecting the environment and in the green energy industry.

The heroin epidemic requires a comprehensive strategy that includes prevention, intervention and treatment. I will be a fierce proponent for ensuring our prescription drug monitoring practices are strengthened, our first responders are equipped to treat overdose victims, our criminal justice system embraces mental and behavioral health services, and treatment and recovery is accessible.

Our economy, education system, energy and environmental challenges have a common link. They can contribute to a declining population that results in a smaller tax base for municipalities and a difficult environment for maintaining quality schools. Yet challenges can be viewed as opportunities to secure an even deeper connection to this place for the next generation and for more individuals today. To honor the place we love, we must create a path forward that inspires.

I have spent my career working as a convener and a problem solver from Buckland to Baghdad to the Berkshires. In each of these places I always found a way to get people to the table with a willingness to work toward solutions. No matter how difficult the issue or the individual, I stood strong for the greater good. I will bring that determination with me to Beacon Hill.

If I am fortunate enough to have your vote on Thursday, Sept. 8, I promise to tackle head on the challenges that impact our daily lives in the Berkshire, Hampshire, Franklin and Hampden district.

Adam Hinds is a Democratic candidate for state Senate.

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Chris Canning: “Show us the money, says GOP candidate”
By Chris Canning, Op-Ed, The Berkshire Eagle, 7/31/2016

PITTSFIELD - I am the Republican candidate for state senator for Western Mass. in November and I have a strong bipartisan following because I represent hope for real change. Due to my extensive background in business and education, coupled with my experience in life, I understand what it means to lose a job, find a job, be a victim of a system, to overcome adversity, and to empathize with my constituents. I know how to reinvent, use creativity, expose corruption, and mend broken systems.

My primary goal is to create a clear economic vision and strategy which encourages sustainable economic growth. My economic goal is to build a stronger and more vibrant area. My priority is to bring professional, mid-level, skilled and unskilled jobs back to our counties by encouraging vocational education, academic training, and incentives to entice the business community to think of our area in terms of commerce.

I want our small businesses to become Supplier Diversity Office (SDO) certified so that they can be eligible for state contracts awarded with grants under executive order 390. After finding a loophole that cost our county a $14 million contract, I worked with Sen. Downing to change the law. A uniform procurement amendment was put into legislation requiring state agencies to give purchasing preference to Massachusetts-based corporations.

From owning companies, I speak from firsthand knowledge of the vicissitudes associated with seeking contracts. If elected, I want to repurpose agriculture, reinvent our infrastructure and renew our economic growth.

I will aggressively entice federal agencies to contract with our counties. Using my experiences from Dubai to Hong Kong, I will work to match the modern economy and global practices, such as promoting tax-free zones.

As your next senator, I want our communities to be part of an innovation train that goes beyond just sustainability. My goal is to rethink, repurpose, reinvent, and stabilize our sketchy economy. We need to encourage R & D, think tanks, and other institutions with deep financial pockets to look at our area as a game changer for investment.

If I am elected your next senator, my goal is to project more transparency, to gain financial trust, to find incentives that are reward-based, to use technology for better accountability, conduct independent analysis of payoffs on investment, and to recognize the work ethic potential of our people. Education and training are key to investment. To be vibrant we must attract potential businesses that can stimulate growth and attract like-minded businesses.

I want to promote regulatory reform. I want to coordinate better local and state rules that overlap. In the current budget system, trust line items and federal line items have the potential to be reallocated, but state line items do not have that flexibility.

As senator, I will set criteria for local investment to match our strategies and anticipated needs by supporting existing business sectors while planning for emerging sectors. I will identify priority areas for economic regeneration, infrastructure provision and environmental enhancement. Look beyond the party labels, and realize I am the best candidate to serve our areas, as my past has shown, my integrity, work ethic, ability to face adversity, and willingness to think outside the box for viable solutions.

With my experience, expertise, and education, I hope you recognize that I am a sound investment as your next public servant. Let me be what Republican U.S. Rep. Silvio Conte once was to our people. I will work to curb taxes and look at best practices so that we can have equitable growth.

I am the only candidate guaranteed to be on the November ballot as the other party has a primary runoff. Start early and prepare. Know before going into the voting booth that you want to go beyond labels. You want the best candidate available, and that is why you your vote should be for Chris Canning as the next state senator of Berkshire, Hampshire, Franklin, and Hampden counties.

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Andrea Harrington: “Public service goals rooted in Berkshires”
By Andrea Harrington, Op-Ed, The Berkshire Eagle, 8/9/2016

GREAT BARRINGTON - For the past decade, we have had tremendous leadership in the Massachusetts state Senate. Ben Downing has been an outstanding advocate for our region, leading on issues impacting Western Massachusetts. When Ben announced that he would not seek re-election this fall, I decided to run for Senate to continue this tireless advocacy for the 52 towns and cities in the district.

This election will have major ramifications on our communities, so I want to take this opportunity to tell you a little about who I am, where I come from, and how my background and life experiences have shaped my approach to public service and advocacy.

UNIQUE PERSPECTIVE

I am running for state Senate because Western Massachusetts needs a bold, progressive leader who has lived and understands the triumphs and challenges of our region. As a small business owner, a parent, and someone who grew up here, I have the unique experience and perspective to make a meaningful impact in office.

My approach to public service is deeply rooted in where I'm from and how I was raised. I grew up in the Berkshires. My dad was a carpenter and my mom cleaned houses for a living, while my grandparents and great grandparents worked at General Electric and Sprague. Hard work was a virtue in our home, and I started working alongside my mom when I was old enough to lend a hand.

Thanks to the hard work and strong values of my parents and grandparents, I have had opportunities that they did not enjoy. I graduated from Pittsfield public schools (Taconic High School) and became the first person in my family to graduate from college, and then law school.

After law school, I worked as an attorney focused on overturning death penalty cases. Since then, I have continued to practice law in Pittsfield and my husband and I own a small business — The Public Market in West Stockbridge.

We are raising our two boys in the small town where I grew up. There is no better place than the Berkshires to raise a family, but we constantly see the impacts of population decline and lack of jobs and opportunity.

As state senator, I will make growing good jobs and economic opportunity my top priorities. As a small business owner, I have seen real, tangible investments that can grow jobs in the Berkshires. My Economic Investment Plan includes proven strategies to create not just jobs, but careers, for Western Massachusetts. This ranges from investment in job training programs, modernizing vocational education for a 21st century economy, expanding broadband internet, creating regional partnerships and fostering greater collaboration throughout all sectors of business and our colleges and universities, and working to make the Berkshires a national leader in both the green and cultural economy.

I also support key investments in our public schools. I am a proud public school parent and have been active in the school site council for my boys. The student funding formula is not working for Western Massachusetts, and I will be a strong advocate to ensure that our PUBLIC schools, students, and teachers are receiving the resources they need to continue the great education that they provide for our kids.

NO DUMPS, FRACKING

Last week, I released a detailed environmental agenda, because I believe that protecting the natural beauty of the Berkshires and making Massachusetts more sustainable are important priorities. That is why I have been an outspoken opponent of the proposed PCB dumps in the Berkshires and the proposed fracked gas pipeline.

Finally, we have seen the opioid epidemic claim the lives of our friends and family members. I applaud the work of all those fighting this public health crisis every day, and it was important to see government come together in a bipartisan way to pass meaningful legislation this spring. We must continue to increase access to recovery beds and prioritize treatment over incarceration for non-violent drug offenders and expand the use of drug courts.

It has been incredible meeting thousands of our neighbors in the Berkshires since we launched our campaign this spring. I will continue to work hard to earn your vote, and I encourage you to read more about my plans and priorities at www.andreaforsenate.com.

Andrea Harrington is a candidate for state Senate from the Western District.

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"Senate hopeful Harrington aims to expand opportunity, fight income disparity"
By Richie Davis, Recorder Staff, August 17, 2016

PITTSFIELD — When state Senate candidate Andrea Harrington returned to southern Berkshire County in 2009 after attending school in Seattle and Washington D.C. and working in criminal law in Florida, she found that the economic landscape had changed.

Harrington, one of three Democrats running for the state Senate seat being vacated by Sen. Benjamin Downing, had gone to Pittsfield public schools, and her family has lived in the Berkshires for generations, many of them working in factory jobs that have now vanished at Sprague Electric and General Electric.

“We had a lot more of those good manufacturing jobs, (but) over time, we’ve seen an increase in service jobs, and there really is dependency on the tourist economy and servicing second-home owners, particularly in south county,” said the Richmond attorney, who watched her family shift from well-paying manufacturing work to servicing the second-home economy: her father moved to carpentering, her mother started a house-cleaning business. Harrington attended the University of Washington and American University’s Washington College of Law.

“In my work, I see a lot of young people who are really struggling, a lot of families in family and probate court who struggle to make ends meet,” said the 41-year-old mother of two, whose husband owns the Public Market in West Stockbridge. “There are two major groups of people: the people who make a living somewhere else and the people who have to earn a living from the people who live here.”

Doing criminal defense as well as divorce and family law, she said, “I see a lot of those people, all the time: They need my help, and can’t afford to hire me.”

She said she’s running for the seat in the 52-community district “because our district needs a leader who understands the challenges facing our communities and will build on the opportunities we have to create jobs and protect our children. … I am running to expand the bright spots in our regional economy. In court I have seen too many lives impacted by financial hardship. … I believe we need to expand economic opportunity in this region.

A board member of Berkshares, a local currency for Berkshire County, Harrington’s work with the organization focuses on supporting local business, growing entrepreneurship, and the new community-supported industry program. She also volunteers with programs to provide expanded educational opportunities for young people in Berkshire County: the Railroad Street Youth Project, the Crocus Fund and the Berkshire Academies’ Mentors.

And she serves on the Affordable Housing Committee in her southern Berkshire County town.

Harrington has been endorsed by the Massachusetts Women’s Political Caucus and a host of labor organizations, including the National Association of Social Workers, Western Massachusetts Carpenters Union Local 108, SEIU Local 888, and the Massachusetts Organization of State Engineers and Scientists.

Harrington says she loves her work, but confesses, “I feel if I’m going to work this hard, I want my work to have a bigger impact. … I really know what people here in our district are going through. And I have the skills to go and be our voice in Boston and to work for state policies that are going to work better for people here. I’ve been working for the past 13 years as an advocate for my clients every day.”

Among her priorities are to advocate for more education funding and job training money from the state in order to attract and keep better jobs in the region.

“I work with a lot of young people who just don’t have the job skills that they need to support their families,” she says. “Supporting our local businesses is something I’m very passionate about.”

Harrington wants to lower energy costs to make the state more attractive to potential employers. She opposes construction of new gas pipelines in the state and the proposed surcharges to pay for them, while supporting lifting the solar net-metering cap to create green jobs and expand renewable energy sources.

Harrington said she’s intrigued by the Pioneer Valley’s Co-Op Power model of community-owned and controlled energy as “hugely empowering,” especially for people who don’t own their own homes or who can’t afford to invest in rooftop solar.

She favors closing corporate tax loopholes and supports a proposed “millionaire’s tax” amendment to help pay for increased workforce development and improving the quality of education.

She points to problems with funding formulas for rural schools and with an overemphasis on testing rather than on learning holistically.

“In Massachusetts, we have one of the most aggressive innovation economies in the country, second only to Silicon Valley,” she said. “I want to pull those opportunities west and make more connections with businesses here in the western part of the state. … I don’t think this is a situation in which Boston’s going to save us; it’s something we’re going to have to do for ourselves, working together. But certainly we need a strong advocate who’s going to fight for us to build those connections between western Mass. businesses and eastern Mass. businesses, and to get the funding, and also a leader to help the district to work together in a coordinated way on expanding economic opportunity.”

Businesses that are already here need help filling jobs by improving the skills of their workers and improving transportation.

“Absolutely having a living wage is key, particularly in this area, where a lot of jobs are service jobs,” Harrington said. “I am a strong proponent of unions. And I see having strong policies for working families, including a $15 wage as being essential to people’s ability to support themselves — and as a way to prevent further income inequality.”

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Three Democrats will compete in the primary election Thursday, Nov. 8 for the Berkshire Hampshire Franklin Hampden Senate seat being vacated after 10 years by Sen. Benjamin Downing, D-Pittsfield. The elected Democrat will run against Republican candidate Christine Canning of Lanesborough, who has no primary opponent. This is the second of three candidate profiles.)

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August 22, 2016

Re: Dan Valenti is unfairly negative against Andrea Harrington for Berkshire State Senator

Like Andrea Harrington, I graduated in 1993, but I went to Pittsfield High School instead of Taconic High School. She has accomplished a lot in her life. She has a law degree, professional experience, runs a small family business, is married with children, and she is invested in the community. She has a positive vision for Berkshire County when the local economy is at its lowest point in decades. She stands for progressive causes, including public education and economic development. She is not the hand-picked candidate that Adam Hinds is by the Pittsfield political machine. She does not have the name recognition that Rinaldo Del Gallo III has in Pittsfield politics. Rinaldo's uncle Remo Del Gallo is a former Pittsfield Mayor who has been involved in Massachusetts state and local politics for many decades. I am friends with Rinaldo and I respect the long standing leadership of his uncle Remo Del Gallo. Andrea Harrington is a long shot in this year's race for Berkshire State Senator. She will probably finish in third place. I don't believe it is fair for Dan Valenti to predict she is running a pseudo-campaign to be a spoiler to split Rinaldo's vote tally in favor of Adam Hinds so she can be set up for a political plum sinecure. Isn't that what Chris Speranzo did? He is the lifelong Pittsfield Clerk of Courts making a 6-figure yearly salary + lucrative state government benefits that will give him a big state government pension in his old age. What about Peter Larkin? He also makes a 6-figure salary as a GE lobbyist who ensures that Pittsfield remain polluted with cancer-causing PCBs! What about William "Smitty" Pignatelli running unopposed for his 8th term as Lenox State Representative? How many terms will this political hack, career politician serve? I predict at least 2 more decades so he can collect a big state government pension in his old age. It is more than fair to point one's finger at Pols like Speranzo, Larkin, and Pignatelli than it is to pass judgment of one's prediction on a qualified candidate with ideals named Andrea Harrington who is running a long-shot campaign for Berkshire State Senator in 2016.

- Jonathan Melle

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"State Senate Candidates Focus On Economics In 5th Debate"
By Andy McKeever, iBerkshires Staff, August 24, 2016

PITTSFIELD, Massachusetts — As director of the Pittsfield Community Connection Adam Hinds reeled in a $5 million grant to fight crime an violence in the city.

Over the next 10 years, the grant will supplement salaries to put at-risk youth in jobs, provide job training, get them counseling, and employed outreach workers who had been in gangs or jail and can show the youth that that lifestyle doesn't work.

The crime numbers overlapped with the three most impoverished census blocks and the program targeted those areas.

"It was with the city and it was saying what are we going to do about the 14- to 24-year-olds who are pulling the trigger?" Hinds said. "It is a very strategic, very deliberate process."

That use of state funds is exactly what Hinds said he will bring to the table if elected to the state Senate during a forum at First United Methodist Church of Pittsfield. The forum was put on by the Independent Voters Committee, a project of the Berkshire County Workers Benefit Council.

The question Hinds was answering was one posed by a member of the audience of more than 50 people.

Rinaldo Del Gallo used his time to disagree with Mayor Linda Tyer's approach by adding more police officers. Del Gallo says what is driving crime isn't a lack of police but rather a poor economy. He says most of his policies he'd take to the Senate focus on economic development. He even cited Portugal which legalized drugs and put money into treatment instead and the numbers decreased.

For Del Gallo, fighting crime isn't about spending more money on police and judges but rather providing economic opportunity.

"If we don't improve our local economy, if we don't have more hope, we are going to have more crime," Del Gallo said.

Andrea Harrington spoke of her time as a defense attorney where she stood in courtrooms with those involved in the system. What she sees is a "school to prison" pipeline and a lack of education, job training, and untreated mental health issues. There is a growing drug problem, she said, but the way to tackle that isn't by just simply arresting drug dealers because another one will takes it place but instead "we need to do something about demand."

The three are all vying for the state Senate seat being vacated by Benjamin Downing, who opted not to run for re-election. But first, one of the three will need to win the Democratic primary on Sept. 8. The winner will then proceed to the general election against Republican Christine Canning-Wilson. Tuesday's debate was the fifth time the three candidates shared the stage to debate the issues but had a more focused issue "workers and poverty."

Harrington says 70 percent of people receiving state SNAP benefits are working and 30 percent of those are working two jobs. To support workers and the economy, there needs to be jobs will living wages, universal preschool, working force development, and training for high-tech jobs.

"It boggles the mind that we don't have it because all of the studies have shown that it is essential for kids to start out with a good life," she said of universal preschool.

As it relates to issues of crime in impoverished areas, often policies are built in to punish people and not support, as one of the questions asserts, and Harrington received a loud applause when she called for criminal justice reform that stops the cycle of judges "shaking down" those in the court system for court costs and fees and instead shift money from putting poor people in jail but to help them from falling into that cycle.

"It is insane and it needs to change," Harrington said.

Del Gallo says he is against "mass incarceration" and instead wants to focus his attention on a $15 minimum wage across the board to raise people out of poverty and to create tuition- and debt-free college. By not focusing on those the poor will get poorer and the middle class will dwindle.

"If we don't invest in our roads, our bridges, our educational institution, and have single-payer, I think the poor will continue to be poor," Del Gallo said.

Del Gallo, who calls himself as a "Bernie Sanders progressive," wants the state to emulate the Nordic socioeconomic model employed in counties like Finland Denmark. In those countries, the policies are a mix between capitalism and socialism.

"You can't get really, really rich, but time after time they do studies, they are the happiest people in the world," Del Gallo said, adding that they are happier because all of the stress and nervousness that comes will being poor is eradicated and in its place more opportunity and hope.

Adam Hinds worked for the United Nations for 10 years. The U.N. has adopted a resolution for 2030 with an array of goals including ending hunger, poverty, improving health, and education. When asked about that resolution, Hinds said the plan is that every county who signed onto it which monitor and report on its individual progress toward those goals.

"We can do better than that here in Massachusetts. We can take each of those elements and go further," Hinds said.

Hinds again cited his work there, with the Pittsfield Community Connection and then with the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition for showing the ability to bring large groups of people together to tackle many goals.

Back to the question of working families, Hinds voiced his support for universal preschool, citing the "30 million word gap." The gap he refers to is that someone from an impoverished area will hear 30 million fewer works by the time the student reaches elementary school.

As for crime, he is opposed increased incarceration and instead calls for investing in reducing recidivism.

When it comes to achieving the 2030 goals outlined by the U.N., Harrington said on the local level it all comes back to income inequality. She said there needs to be a focused effort on bringing better paying jobs to the region.

"We need to work together to build a vision of what we want our economy to be, that supports local people, and keeps money in our economy," Harrington said.

Harrington would like to see more green jobs and a more localized economy where agriculture and food companies can service the county instead of having goods shipped in from other areas. She sat on the board for BerkShares, which was one program to help keep the dollars in the county.

From a panel asking the questions, the Rev. Keith Evans cited the lose of SABIC, North Adams Regional Hospital, Best Buy, Macy's, Old Country Buffet, and Price Chopper and asked the candidates what will they do to bring high-quality jobs to the district.

"I always talk about the $15 minimum wage at tremendous length. This is a very big deal," Del Gallo said.

Del Gallo said he not only supports a $15 minimum wage across the board but also support for family medical leave as ways to improve the value of the jobs in Berkshire County. He took shots at Hinds' stance on the minimum wage, claiming Hinds has been inconsistent with his approach.

Hinds responded by saying he supports the minimum wage but believes it should be done on an incremental approach to protect small businesses.

"I actually do support the $15 minimum wage," Hinds said. "The minimum wage right now is a poverty wage. It is $10 an hour and if you work 40 hours you are still below the federal poverty line."

His approach to attracting more jobs comes on a couple levels. One, support the Berkshire Innovation Center to allow the current manufacturing companies to grow, invest in and work with Berkshire Community College, McCann Technical School, and Taconic High School on workforce development to provide the skilled workers companies need and struggle to find around here, and tackle the "digital divide" where areas of the county do not have access to high speed internet.

Harrington calls for a "systematic" and "regionwide" approach to economic development and promised to fight for resources to support local businesses here now and bringing specialty manufacturing to the county. Harrington also said she wants more focused on agriculture and food products.

Harrington said she knows the struggles of small businesses first hand and when asked about electricity costs, she said she can relate. She said the store her husband owns in West Stockbridge carries a $2,000 a month electricity bill, which jumped during a spike in 2014 and 2015 to $5,000.

"I do get the power of the electric companies for sure and the urgency to create power that is locally controlled," Harrington said. "I don't think the answer is more pipelines or more pollution with oil and gas. I think the answer is looking at ways to bring power within the control of the local community."

She said solar is a "class issue" because "I can't afford to put panels on my house and many other people can't either." She'd be an advocate for more tax credits for solar to make it more affordable. She also calls for a cooperative model, such has been created in Greenfield, where customers own the power generation system.

Hinds said the spike in 2014 and 2015 was somewhat caused by a poorly executed electricity choice program. The utility companies added a recalculation fee to the bills because of changes to the power producers, which had been somewhat rebated since then. But, that was only a temporary fix.

He said the state's energy bill does not go far in enough in expanding the state's portfolio and is calling for a more diverse mix of energy sources.

"I would advocate for investing in energy storage," Hinds said.

Del Gallo is calling for programs to place solar panels on public housing units. He says there needs to be a massive investment in energy infrastructure, which will create jobs, lower heating costs, and lower greenhouse emissions.

When it comes to the power of utility companies, Del Gallo is calling for regulation that will disallow electric companies from being able to deny turning on service if an old debt has not been paid. Del Gallo says the utility companies should have to go after debts through the court system like other debts, than refusing to provide such a vital service.

What Del Gallo doesn't believe in for the economy is focusing so much on arts. Del Gallo said he someone who attends arts events and "loves the arts" but shouldn't be the centerpiece of the economic future.

"We can't have a society of symphonies. We need real work," Del Gallo said. "We need to have industry and high-tech to come back. We need educational institution."

Hinds said the arts is only one part of the economic picture, but "it is a huge piece." He said the arts have shown the ability to revitalize downtowns and in North Adams and Williamstown the creation of a cultural corridor is leading to a Mass MoCA expansion, new museums, and new hotels.

"The more we add to this, the more likely someone will come to Berkshire County and spend the night," Hinds said.

The more people coming from out of town and spending money helps support the local businesses, he said.

Harrington said for every $1 invested in the arts, $7 comes back through tourism. Local businesses depend on those visitors, she said.

But, the issue with those industries are that it doesn't always pay enough to support families.

"Our economy depends on that sector. But, yes we need to add better paying jobs," she said.

North Adams lost hundreds of high-paying jobs with the closure of North Adams Regional Hospital. But the city also lost access to a number of health services needed in that region.

Harrington said the hospital didn't close because it wasn't financially viable and she would work with Berkshire Health Systems to try to restore a full-service hospital.

"Going to Berkshire Medical Center for critical care is really problematic for people in North Adams," Harrington said. "There are people choosing to leave the hospital against medical advice because it was so far from their families."

Hinds said the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition has been focused on dealing with the factors surrounding the lose of the hospital. He said even before the hospital was closed there was a shortage of primary care physicians and he'd work to address that. He'd also like to see more community health workers to address causes of health problems such as smoking for hypertension.

"We need to elevate the health of the community in the first place," Hinds said.

Del Gallo simply said he'd build a new hospital.

"My solution to this is to actually build a hospital, use an existing facility and build a public hospital," he said, doubling down on his support for a single-payer health care system.

The forum was moderated by Rev. Quinton Chin.

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Letter: "Harrington is dedicated, qualified for state Senate"
The Berkshire Eagle, 8/25/2016

To the editor:

Andrea Harrington is the best Democratic candidate for state Senate and is, by far, the best person to replace our out-going Sen. Ben Downing for a host of reasons.

Her qualifications are superb and her dedication to her clients is supreme. Andrea will represent each and everyone one of us with the same zeal that she represents her clients because that is the nature of her experience and talents.

First and foremost, Andrea is a Berkshire county native. She hails from a working class family from Pittsfield, whose fortunes ebbed and flowed just like the rest of the folks in the country. She will work tirelessly to bring new green, technological jobs that will launch a new round of prosperity in the district.

Andrea came back to the Berkshires so her two sons could attend Berkshire public schools just like she did. She is personally invested in making the district's schools the very best possible.

Andrea's day job — if running a small business and raising children isn't enough — is as an attorney. Andrea represents real people, families, and children who need help in dealing with legal issues. She is devoted to zealously representing all of her clients, male or female, young or old, black or white, LBGT, often without regard to the ability to pay.

The importance of Andrea's career representing real persons is that she will represent each and every person in the district with the same zeal and personal commitment that she has demonstrated with client after client.

Andrea is committed to preserving our beautiful scenic environment. Andrea intends to keep it that way. She will insure that environmentally unsound practices that threaten this beauty will not invade the Berkshires.

In addition to the long list of reasons why Andrea is the best candidate for state Senate, (you can read many more at www.andreaforsenate.com) there is one more reason why Andrea's election is so important. Not only is she the best qualified, but she will also shatter the glass ceiling that has prevented extraordinarily competent women from obtaining high public office.

Andrea Harrington is a very competent, capable, talented woman ready to lead all of us in to a new world of equality and prosperity. I urge you to vote for Andrea Harrington on Sept. 8.

Al Harper, Lenox

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Letter: “Harrington is prepared to be state senator”
The Berkshire Eagle, 8/23/2016

To the editor:

I am writing to encourage you to vote for Andrea Harrington in the Democratic primary for state Senate on Thursday, Sept. 8.

I have known Andrea for about 10 years, since I was asked to serve as her mentor on her first criminal appellate cases. I worked closely with her on those cases, and I saw, first hand, how devoted she was to her clients. All of these clients are indigent, in trouble with the law, and many have no experience with or understanding of criminal procedure or criminal law. Andrea's commitment to people with few resources and with tremendous needs was so admirable. She fought tirelessly for their constitutional rights in every single case.

Representing people — regardless of social status, income, or advantage — is exactly what a state senator does. Like a public defender who speaks for those without a voice, a senator advocates for the needs of those in her district. Like an attorney for those who require social services or mental health placements or foster care, a senator must know where resources are available and how to implement programs if resources are lacking. Andrea Harrington has spent every day of her career doing exactly that.

During the years when I was Andrea's mentor, I observed her keen intellect, her understanding of the law, and her deep appreciation for the constitutional principles upon which our codes of law are founded. Andrea's legal training and experience have taught her to parse a statute to understand its meaning and to look to its legislative history for an appreciation of the statute's significance. That is exactly what legislators do.

Andrea has the perfect background, training, and intelligence to excel at the job of legislating. There is no other Democratic candidate for state Senate with Andrea Harrington's upbringing, credentials, compassion, and commitment.

Janet Hetherwick Pumphrey, Lenox

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Letter: Hinds' moral character make him ideal choice
The Berkshire Eagle
POSTED: 08/23/2016 12:54:32 PM EDT

Hinds' moral character make him ideal choice

To the editor:

Adam Hinds' dedication to problem-solving through complex negotiations amongst opposing parties and his lifetime spent striving to make his fellow Berkshire residents lives better, especially those most at risk, make him the perfect and only choice for state senator.

When someone of his moral character enters public service, it's an opportunity we can't pass up. Finally, a "politician" we can truly be proud of!

Jeff Snoonian, Adams
The writer is chairman of the Adams Board of Selectmen. He is writing for himself, not the select board.

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Alan Chartock | I, Publius: “State Senate primary candidates should be judged on merits”
By Alan Chartock, Op-Ed, The Berkshire Eagle, 8/26/2016

GREAT BARRINGTON - Here comes the Sept. 8 state senatorial primary.

And since the victorious Democrat likely will win the election — a Republican candidate winning in the Berkshires seems far-fetched — the three way race is big news.

I love this one because it shows that there are times when democracy really works. Three candidates, Andrea Harrington, Adam Hinds and Rinaldo Del Gallo, are running.

The winner will face Republican candidate Christine Canning in November.

Hinds is an attractive candidate. When you meet him you can't help but like him. Despite a very impressive educational background he just makes you feel that he is a regular guy.

His resume is extraordinarily impressive. His list of endorsements is incredible, ranging from former U.S. Rep. John Olver to a series of impressive unions.

The man has worked like a dog to win. He went to Wesleyan and studied at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts. His father was a Vietnam vet, his mother a school teacher. He is the real thing. He seeks to replace Sen. Benjamin B. Downing and what's remarkable is how alike the two men look. Hinds speaks extremely well and is clearly the leading candidate in this election.

Andrea Harrington is a wonderful, smart (even brilliant) woman who goes out of her way to help people. She and her husband own one of my favorite Berkshire establishments, the Public Market in West Stockbridge. Harrington has a number of things going for her including the fact that she is a young woman and we certainly need a lot more women in politics.

She is skilled attorney, a partner in a good Berkshire law firm and has earned her liberal credentials by playing a big part in the Florida effort to overturn the death penalty. She's local, too.

In case you haven't looked, criminal justice reform is at the top of almost every center left liberal's bucket list. Like Hinds, Harrington has worked extraordinarily hard. Her signs are all over the place.

Also like Hinds, she spends a lot of time going door to door and this young mother would bring a perspective of youth and motherhood to a Senate that needs a lot more like her. If you talk to her for 5 minutes you realize that she's tough enough for the job.

Rinaldo Del Gallo considers himself a liberal Democrat, a spokesman for fathers in custody battles and a sometimes journalist who writes columns for this and other papers.

A member of the Massachusetts bar since 1996, he went to Pittsfield High School and Northeastern University in Boston. His name is surely familiar as an early supporter of Bernie Sanders campaign for the presidency. He is in favor of the $15 minimum wage.

Del Gallo has been active in civic matters in Pittsfield and Berkshire County, and he was instrumental in helping Pittsfield draft its prohibition on polystyrene food containers. He currently is working with the city's Green Committee to expand that prohibition to single-use plastic shopping bags.

He has a law practice and often represents clients in family law matters, and he is the spokesperson for the Berkshire Fatherhood Coalition.

But against the other two candidates, a lifetime in this business tells me that he's a long shot.

This is one of those elections in which you just wish there could be more than one winner.

Ben Downing should be the model for his successor. Let me just say that this is one tough job. Because of the number of bodies who are registered to vote, the covered area is huge.

If you come home to the district nightly, you have a two-hour commute. Everyone wants something from you and you have to listen to each supplicant. Plus you have to keep looking for money, a process that never stops.

Harrington, who has small children, understands the balance that is needed. Some people do not.

This is the worst kind of sexist trap. I have a wife who worked all her life and we got through it. Much of one salary went for child care and Roselle was able to get a doctorate at UMass, a herculean commute, and that after all her work at Monument Mountain.

My own mother did the same thing, working full time in our schools, teaching at Hunter at night, and while her twins undoubtedly have the same difficulties everyone else does, we both did OK.

My point is that both Hinds and Harrington are great candidates and should be judged by what they have accomplished. I just want to make sure that credentials and the ability to do the job come first and that extraneous, sexist issues are not allowed to distract.

This is a good election and it gives us the opportunity to vote for someone good, as opposed to the lesser of two evils.

Alan Chartock, a Great Barrington resident, is president and CEO of WAMC Northeast Public Radio and a professor emeritus of communications at SUNY-Albany. The opinions expressed by columnists do not necessarily reflect the views of The Berkshire Eagle.

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Letter: "Harrington dedicated to welfare of others"
The Berkshire Eagle, 8/26/2016

To the editor:

On Thursday, Sept. 8, voters will go to the polls for the primary election. In the state Senate race, I will proudly cast my vote for Andrea Harrington, who I believe has the skills and values to be the most effective legislator for our district.

Ms. Harrington is a stalwart advocate for working families. She understands that when employees are respectfully treated and properly compensated, we all win. Employees making fair wages have the ability to support the local community, thus benefiting small businesses and the local tax base. Harrington clearly understands the connection between labor and the business, between our government and its citizens.

Ms. Harrington has devoted much of her legal career to working with those individuals that many would rather forget. Her experience working to overturn death penalty convictions in Florida testifies to her commitment to social justice. Her work as a bar advocate is a local example of her willingness to stand with people in need. Those with law degrees have many options available to them; only a few like Ms. Harrington choose to use their training to benefit the most vulnerable among us. Clearly, Ms. Harrington will be a strong advocate for all of us the district no matter who we are.

Andrea Harrington will also stand for our children. As the candidate who has been against charter schools since before entering the race, she understands the financial drain these institutions place on our community school budgets. She is a public school parent who cares about the education of all of our children.

She also supports a strong public college and university system, allowing all of our citizens a chance to earn a degree or certificate. Ms. Harrington also believes in the value of a strong vocational education path, knowing that the future economy will need people with skills in many, many occupational areas to flourish.

On primary day, I will give my vote to Andrea Harrington. Her positive attitude, devotion to all citizens, proven ability to work for the vulnerable and with people across the district informed my decision. I hope you will join me in supporting the best person to be part of the local legislative team — Andrea Harrington.

Liz Recko-Morrison, Pittsfield

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Letter: "Harrington will lead on progressive issues"
The Berkshire Eagle, 8/26/2016

To the editor:

Andrea Harrington is smart, tough and committed to representing the working families of the Berkshire, Hampshire, Franklin and Hampden state Senate District.

I first met Ms. Harrington when she came to the Lanesborough Democratic Town Committee Caucus in March. She introduced herself and I handed her a short questionnaire which she filled out in five minutes. I was impressed that she wrote what she thought without being "political."

It didn't hurt that she mostly agreed with me. I was delighted that she supported public education by opposing the expansion of the number of charter schools which are taking $400 million from the commonwealth's public schools, including $2 million from Pittsfield. She knows we need more funds for public education, not less, which is why she supported the "millionaire's tax."

The next time I met Andrea is when she came to the Old Forge in Lanesborough to join us when we celebrated the fact that the proposed Northeast Energy Direct pipeline of fracked gas would not be built through our water system and through the middle of our town. I was delighted to see that she would be with us.

Andrea is a progressive who will represent us in Boston, now and In the future. She has my vote.

Russell Freedman, Lanesborough

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Letter: "Hinds will be advocate for wide spectrum of voters"
The Berkshire Eagle, 8/26/2016

To the editor:

Adam Hinds will be a fine state senator representing the 52 towns of western Massachusetts, and here are some reasons I will be voting for him in the primary.

As a retired teacher and active parent, I know Adam comes from a public education background, and places high value on offering quality opportunity to all children. We have discussed the need for examining the school funding formulas to maximize resources available to students and teachers.

He is also aware of the tremendous job skilled educators continue to do with our kids from infancy on up, and promotes recognition and pay equity for professionals and non-professionals working with children. He has worked with at-risk youth in communities in Pittsfield and North Adams. This is why Adam has earned the endorsement of thousands of workers, including the Massachusetts Teachers Association, and the SEIU, which represents those in health care.

As a Select Board member in Monterey, I know Adam recognizes the importance of small towns in our region. He has met with citizens of our town and heard their concerns. He comes from a small town in Western Massachusetts, and Adam understands that we play more than a supporting role in economic development throughout the region. We deserve real, effective assistance in making our voices heard in the Statehouse when it comes to critical issues including internet access, transportation, environment, and the arts and culture, and Adam will stand with us.

As a senior, I know Adam respects and pays attention to the needs and concerns of our growing senior community in the Berkshires. He has joined us at Age-Friendly Berkshires meetings to listen, learn and begin to address those needs so more seniors can comfortably and safely age in place in our homes and home towns.

Adam Hinds is an energetic, involved listener, experienced leader and thoughtful problem solver who will devote himself to serving the spectrum of people throughout our Senate district. Please join me in voting for Adam Hinds in the Sept. 8 primary, and in the November election.

Carol Lewis Edelman, Egremont

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Letter: "Harrington will bring principled toughness"
The Berkshire Eagle, 8/29/2016

To the editor:

On Thursday, Sept. 8, I'll proudly cast my vote for Andrea Harrington to represent us in the state Senate.

Her energetic campaign has demonstrated that she'll bring a powerful, progressive and independent voice to issues that matter: Creating opportunity for working families by building a locally based, sustainable, fair economy; making necessary investments in public education and health care; reform of our criminal-justice system, and protecting public health and our environment by standing up to corporate polluters and the fossil-fuel industry.

It's a rare opportunity. Too often, elections offer more of the same: Safe, tired, nonspecific rhetoric from candidates more interested in ingratiating themselves with the powers-that-be than boldly standing up and speaking out for their constituents. But this year we can elect a state senator with experience, ideas, courage and vision that will make a real difference.

I'm certain that Andrea Harrington's principled toughness will earn respect and cooperation from her colleagues in Boston while also putting vested interests on notice: Her knowledge, passion, and compassion will be deployed forcefully every day on behalf of her constituents, and she won't allow the money and politics-as-usual power of status-quo interests to get in her — or our — way.

Bill Shein, Alford

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Letter: "Andrea Harrington is true progressive in race"
The Berkshire Eagle, 8/29/2016

To the editor:

I enthusiastically support Andrea Harrington as our next state senator. Harrington is the true progressive in this race who will fight for working families. Harrington understands our needs in North Berkshire.

Many of us are still reeling from the trauma of losing North Adams Regional Hospital. Not only did we lose over 500 jobs in just a matter of days, we lost the heart of our community. Her opponent, Adams Hinds, does not advocate restoring a full hospital. Great Barrington, a community of the same size, but with much more wealth (which means they get heard), still has its hospital.

We need our elected officials working for us again. Hinds does not support a $15 minimum wage across the board, but Harrington does. He has gone back and forth on raising the cap on charter schools, while the state Democratic Party recently voted to support keeping the cap and voting no on Question 2.

During the Senate debate at Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, Hinds was called out for taking fund-raising money from Kinder Morgan backers and from Berkshire Health Systems. And, it's important to note that Harrington has not dodged questions like Hinds has in previous debates and she has been consistent with her progressive stances. To break it down, Hinds is a clearly a politician, while Harrington is representing us.

During the primary, I logged many hours making phone calls and knocking on doors to help nominate Bernie Sanders as the nominee for the Democratic Party. Bernie took the mask off of the party to reveal how corporate interests run this country and why so little gets done in Congress for working families. We need to get big money out of politics and Harrington has made this a crucial part of her fight. She understands that until this happens, politics will not work for us.

Please join me in voting for Andrea Harrington on Sept. 8. She will represent all of the counties, even the ones without a strong voice (or a big wallet).

Dawn Klein, Adams, The writer is a parent and public school teacher.

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Letter: "Hinds will confront challenges, embrace opportunities"
The Berkshire Eagle, 8/29/2016

To the editor:

Rarely in this region do we find ourselves at such an important change in our regional leaders as we look to elect our next state senator. Locally, we are faced with challenges impacting many places: decreasing population, needed infrastructure improvements, challenges with opioid addiction and abuse, and gaps in our economy that magnify socioeconomic difficulties and unemployment rates.

To tackle these issues, we need someone with a strong voice and significant, intimate knowledge. We need someone who can frame solutions and activate them through regional and state collaborations. On top of that, we need someone who will actually hear the public to better understand how they perceive and are impacted by these challenges from the individual, household, and community levels. We need someone who values the stakeholders, and will represent them with strength and diligence. That someone is Adam Hinds.

On the other end of the spectrum, we are an area on the verge. We're a place that the world is starting to see for what many of us have always known; there is greatness here. This comes in the form of regional cultural development, grass-roots initiatives, economic investment, a heritage of hard work, and a place of community pride. It comes from all types, from the concerned lifelong citizen working to preserve our history, to the newcomer looking to create the next "big thing," to the cities and towns working to do their best for the greater good.

This palpable energy is something that our next leadership can't just observe from a distance, but is something they need to embrace and enhance by rallying support to amplify the impact. We need someone who will take this great opportunity and potential and help push it past the verge and into reality. That someone is Adam Hinds.

As a North Adams city councilor, I firmly believe we need Adam Hinds for both the good days and the bad, the challenges and the opportunities. He is someone with the skills, experiences, passion, and drive to be our next step toward a bright future as a region, and he is the person I believe should be our next state senator.

Benjamin Lamb, North Adams

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Letter: "For many reasons, Harrington is best choice for state Senate"
The Berkshire Eagle, 8/30/2016

To the editor:

I am writing to endorse Andrea Harrington in the Democratic primary for state Senator on Thursday, Sept. 8.

There are many, many reasons why Andrea is the most qualified candidate. She grew up in the Berkshires, went to school in Pittsfield, is from a working class family, was the first person in her family to attend college, is a successful lawyer whose practice is representing "the little guy," runs a small business with her husband, has two children in Berkshire schools, and understands all of the issues affecting the district.

Andrea is very qualified because she is a woman whose entire life has involved meeting and overcoming challenges. Her endorsement by the Massachusetts Women's Political Caucus speaks volumes. On its web site, the caucus cites a study that demonstrated that women legislators spend more of their efforts and time advocating for issues that are important to women and families: health, education, affordable and accessible day care, and issues pertaining to the well-being of children. In addition, women legislators bring more resources back to their home districts, are more likely to work across the aisle, and sponsor and co-sponsor more pieces of legislation than their male counterparts do.

In the words of Hillary Clinton, "If fighting for women's health care and paid family leave and equal pay is playing the woman card, then deal me in."

Andrea Harrington is the BEST choice for state senator on Sept. 8.

P. Keyburn Hollister, Pittsfield

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Letter: "Hinds is impressive on veterans' issues"
The Berkshire Eagle, 8/30/2016

To the editor:

I have never seen myself as a political person nor someone who has been civically active in my community. I don't vote often because I have never really felt like it mattered because they never cared about people like me.

However, I have had the distinct honor and privilege to serve in the U.S. Air Force Reserve for 13 years and been deployed twice to Afghanistan. I found myself interested in this state Senate race when I had the opportunity to speak with Adam Hinds about his experiences in the Middle East.

I did not feel like I was talking to a politician. He told me how grateful he was to the men and women of the armed forces for protecting him, and he will never forget it.

He then asked me how he could help, which meant the world to me. He did not tell me what he was going to do for me but wanted to understand the needs of veterans. I was amazed to see my thoughts used to help create his statement on veterans and PTSD. He actually heard what I said!

Adam is the only candidate running for state Senate who has shown any interest in helping the veteran community. That is why I will be voting for Adam Hinds on Thursday, Sept. 8. Berkshire County and Massachusetts need more politicians like Adam who want to bring us together and help average people like me.

Carmen Provenzano Ostrander, Great Barrington

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Letter: "Harrington is truly a candidate for our times"
The Berkshire Eagle, 8/30/2016

To the editor:

As a resident of the Berkshires since 1948 who has been involved in local, national and international politics for many years — I knew and collaborated with Silvio Conte back when! — I have been thrilled to watch another Berkshire citizen, a young woman with deep roots in the community, pledge herself to public service and a run for the state Senate.

Andrea Harrington is truly a candidate for our times: from the community, yet with a perspective embracing the interdependence of our region with the state, the nation and the world. Not a "player" in Boston, but a vital presence here with a deep understanding of the economic challenges facing Western New England.

Harrington also has an appreciation of the promise of this community — from young women and men seeking jobs and an education, to cultural institutions devoted not just to summer tourists but to the welfare of our communities year-round.

I know Andrea Harrington makes no special argument for her role as a candidate who is a woman, but permit me to make that argument: I have watched how women like Elizabeth Warren and Kirsten Gillibrand, and Hillary Clinton too, have brought a leadership inflected by empathy and compassion to our politics, and have challenged the paradigm of (excuse the expression) testosterone-charged patriarchal politics of the kind represented by presidential candidate Donald Trump. Andrea combines the articulate smarts of an attorney with the capacity to listen of a mature woman who is raising a family, lending support to a husband running a small business, and thinking about the needs of her fellow citizens.

That is the person we need to represent us in the state Senate and help renew our ever more challenged democracy.

Benjamin R. Barber, Richmond

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From left, Rinaldo DelGallo and Andrea Harrington listen to Adam Hinds speaks during a State Senate debate at Berkshire Community College on Monday, August 29, 2016. Gillian Jones — The Berkshire Eagle | photos.berkshireeagle.com

“Beacon Hill hopefuls trade barbs at Berkshire Community College debate ahead of Democratic primary”
By Dick Lindsay, The Berkshire Eagle, 8/29/2016

PITTSFIELD — Later in the evening, the three people vying for the Democratic nod in the 1st Berkshire District Senate seat: Rinaldo Del Gallo and Adam Hinds of Pittsfield and Andrea Harrington from West Stockbridge took part in another 60-minute question and answer session. The victor goes head-to-head against Lanesborough Republican Christine Canning in November, the winner succeeding Benjamin Downing who opted against another re-election bid.

Senatorial debate

Charter schools, recreational marijuana and a proposed mileage tax highlighted some of the issues the three Democratic senatorial candidates debated.

Hinds and Harrington oppose Question 2 to lift the cap on charter schools, claiming they are a financial drain on public education

"Charter schools take too much money from public school and they lack accountability," Harrington said.

Del Gallo criticize his opponents for failing to say they would support the wishes of voters if they approve Question 2.

As for the ballot question legalizing recreational marijuana use, Del Gallo supports the measure saying using police resources to arrest pot users is a waste of money.

Hinds is more concerned about the medical impacts of recreational use by young people.

"We've seen the brain doesn't stop developing until at 24 or 25 years of age," he said. "[The law] would need to have protections in place."

Approval of recreational pot use would follow the voters mandate of four years ago backing medical marijuana use, something the state has been slow to implement, according to Harrington.

All three did agree taxing the number of miles people drive as an alternative to a gasoline tax would hurt Western Massachusetts drivers. The so-called Mileage Tax is considered a better way to raise more money to repair bridges and roads.

Del Gallo disagreed, saying "I hate flat taxes on everyone because they affect the poor."

Contact Dick Lindsay at 413-496-6233. rlindsay@berkshireeagle.com @BE_DLindsay on Twitter.

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Letter: "Talented Harrington will help bring balance to Legislature"
The Berkshire Eagle, 8/31/2016

To the editor:

As a 74-year seasoned citizen, I strongly support our next state senator, Attorney Andrea Harrington, and cannot wait to vote for her on Thursday, Sept. 8.

She will have my vote because she is exceptional and has already proven herself to be a great public servant. And make no doubt about it, women must continue to be exceptional to even entertain running for elective office.

Attorney Harrington cares about, will support, represent, and fight for all the constituents in our Senate district. Her legal background, knowledge and experience dealing with the very real and crucial problems facing our neighborhoods and country have fully prepared her. She completely understands the needs of the most vulnerable, all of which demonstrate that she truly believes in the rule of law and justice for all.

Women are underrepresented in all of our legislative bodies, unconscionable at this time in our history, and that disparity in inequality must be addressed and remedied.

Having run for office twice in Bridgeport, Conn., in 1984 and again in 2000, I know how hard it is for anyone to run for office, especially a woman. Because of threats in 1984, I had to have a bodyguard on either side of me throughout the day of the primary.

As a law school administrator in Bridgeport, I know the trials of women trying to break the glass ceiling. Nearly every position I held in my paid working life was either a hostile work environment or I was sexually or verbally harassed at a time when the men I was working with were making four, five or more times my wages or salary!

It is truly a joy to support a talented, knowledgeable, creative, seriously thoughtful and solutions-focused individual who listens to each person's very real concerns and plans to address each and every one of those concerns when elected to office.

Please join me on Thursday, Sept. 8, to vote for Andrea Harrington for state senator in the Democratic primary.

Rachel I. Branch, North Adams

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Letter: "Harrington will be a warrior for Western Massachusetts"
The Berkshire Eagle, 9/1/2016

To the editor:

Tough. Talented. Tenacious. Timely. That's Andrea Harrington and these are just a few of the reasons I'm supporting her bid in the Democratic primary to fill the seat vacated by our beloved Sen. Ben Downing.

I live in Middlefield, one of the 52 towns in District 1. Andrea visited us here and talked about herself and her campaign, but more than that she asked good questions about our issues and both encouraged and listened to our answers.

One of the things she spoke of is the power of the voice of the people. At a recent debate, when asked what could be done to solve our problems, she mentioned the long history of grass-roots activists in the Berkshires and pointed to a recent example of success — opposition to the Kinder-Morgan pipeline. As history and Bernie Sanders have reminded us, real change doesn't happen from the top down, but from the bottom up.

Hundreds of area folks recently turned out to see Elizabeth Warren at BCC. As I listened to our great warrior of a U.S. senator I thought about how much Andrea, too, believes in people and place and in government that is accountable to both.

While we have two very good Democratic candidates running for this office, I believe Andrea is the right choice for these times. She is a new face in politics — a warrior like Ben Downing and Elizabeth Warren in working for funding our schools, creating good jobs, developing small businesses, providing housing families can afford, ensuring a healthy environment and building a promising future. She is also a fierce advocate for working together, from the bottom up, with all voices welcome, which is the very essence of the Berkshires and of good government.

I strongly support Andrea Harrington to represent Western Mass. I welcome having her fresh, young and female voice in the state Senate.

Cathy Roth, Middlefield

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Letter: "Harrington provides an excellent example"
The Berkshire Eagle, 9/1/2016

To the editor:

I am writing to encourage you to vote for Andrea Harrington for state senator on Sept. 8.

While Andrea has legal training, intellect and experience as a lawyer, there is more. She is a positive example, of which our community and children can be proud! She is well-spoken, respectful and determined, thus able to communicate, influence and persuade.

Contrast the current presidential election, a carnival sideshow! That alone is sad, but the trickle-down effect is worse on our communities and children. The barbaric, mudslinging nature of our presidential race doesn't resemble civilization. Help put the civil back in civilization!

Anchored through generations of family, Andrea cares. Andrea and her husband, Tim, are business people. Her extended family is absolutely incredible, hard-working, self-made, working class and humble. When your reasons are driven by heart, love and positive example, you are a winner because you have access to greater power. As a mother of two incredible children, Andrea understands that the resolution of problems comes from the drive behind love and peace.

The presidential election is driven by ego, blame, denial and lies — bad examples for our communities and children to absorb. Poor communication builds barriers that distract from accomplishment. Respect and understanding open doors. When you speak with clarity, you will communicate more effectively.

Andrea communicates with respect and grace, listening and understanding the whole situation. Andrea is a positive role model with a history of actions of which she can be proud! We have the power on Sept. 8. Choose Andrea Harrington for state Senate.

Bernie Fallon, West Stockbridge

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Letter: "Hinds understands roots of opioid epidemic"
The Berkshire Eagle, 9/1/2016

To the editor:

As communities continue to battle the scourge of the heroin epidemic, I look to those who truly understand the crisis. As the executive director of the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition, Adam Hinds has been working closely with North Adams Mayor Richard Alcombright and other elected and community officials to help those overcome addiction to this terrible drug.

Adam understands that, at its core, this is a public health crisis, and treating it that way is the only path to overcoming it. I agree that what we need more then ever is better access for addicts to treatment facilities.

While we need to continue strong drug enforcement, we need to better understand who may need to be incarcerated and those who need treatment. Too often we simply throw addicts into jail. This does nothing but exacerbate the problem. Adam has a thoughtful plan to attack this epidemic and hopefully see it to its end.

As we move closer to the state primary on Thursday, Sept. 8, I urge you to get out and vote. My vote for state senator will be with Adam Hinds.

Brian Miksic, North Adams

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Letter: "Harrington will be an advocate for Berkshires"
The Berkshire Eagle, 9/2/2016

To the editor:

State Senate candidate Andrea Harrington will advocate for workers' rights and collective bargaining rights. She will fight against tax breaks for the rich and corporations that ship our jobs overseas.

Andrea will be advocate for a full service hospital in North Adams and one standard of care for the entire county. She will advocate for a renewable locally controlled energy policy, and for community supported agriculture and industry. Andrea will advocate for universal Pre-K for our children.

Andrea Harrington will be a strong advocate for us in Boston on these issues and others. She is the best of three good candidates. Vote for Harrington on Thursday, Sept. 8.

Richard Dassatti, North Adams

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Letter: "Del Gallo has helped many, will help more in Boston"
The Berkshire Eagle, 9/2/2016

To the editor:

I am writing to endorse Rinaldo Del Gallo III for the Massachusetts state Senate.

Readers of The Eagle will be familiar with Rinaldo from his many interesting and informative op-eds, as well as coverage of his career as a lawyer, representation of the Berkshire Fatherhood Coalition and now as a Bernie Sanders progressive Democrat running for state Senate. Some of his other activities include gaining a ban on Styrofoam cups in Pittsfield as well as bringing the designs of pipeline advocates to the attention of the public in this campaign.

I am a witness to his humanity and concern for justice which has led him to represent many county residents in court pro bono. In my own case, Rinaldo has represented me in a contested post-divorce decree case, as well as representing my daughter when she became an assault victim. He also represented me when DCF assumed custody of my daughter when I brought her to a hospital in Springfield for tests not available in this county for concussion victims under the age of 18. It was three weeks before, due to his able representation I was able to learn what her diagnosis and treatment was.

During the same three weeks, DCF and/or the hospital allowed my daughter to believe I had abandoned her at the hospital. Needless to say, both my daughter and I appreciated his efforts on our behalf, which he spent a lot of time on, without any pay, due to his concern to see that justice was done.

I am not the first or last person to benefit from his able representation. I believe if we support Rinaldo to be our senator he will be able to help even more people. We couldn't have a better representative in the Senate, where his intelligence, judgment and concern for the working class will provide us with an able voice. I encourage others to attend the debates and forums with the other Democratic candidates for this important position and am convinced that the majority of those who do will also support and vote for him in the Sept. 8 primary.

James A. Martin, Pittsfield

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Letter: "Harrington prepared to be state senator"
The Berkshire Eagle, 9/2/2016

To the editor:

Andrea Harrington embodies confidence, knowledge, expertise and integrity! She is compassionate and has insight to the root causes of the social ills that are plaguing our communities. Andrea's life journey has prepared her for this moment at this: H time. She truly understands the diverse needs of Western Massachusetts.

Andrea not only has read books on poverty, substance abuse, domestic violence, education, access to health care, business and the criminal justice system, she has experienced many of them personally and professionally.

My candidate for state Senate was born and educated in Berkshire public schools, and is a first generation college graduate, an attorney who has served some of the most marginalized communities in our country. Representing those on death row gave her a deep grasp of the impact of poverty on individuals, families and society.

She is ready to join other legislators in addressing the opioid epidemic, ensure families' economic, educational and health needs are met in Pittsfield and Western Massachusetts.

We are fortunate to have such a candidate in our midst who has the ability to lead us into the future. We need someone with the skills to embrace the demographic and economic shifts that are occurring in the Berkshires. These times need such a leader as Andrea Harrington, Democrat for state Senate. Please join me in voting for her on Thursday, Sept. 8.

Shirley Edgerton. Pittsfield

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Letter: "Hinds will help forge a brighter future"
The Berkshire Eagle, 9/2/2016

To the editor:

I have lived in the Berkshires for 20 years. I was born and raised here, and while I attend Brandeis University during the school months, my Berkshire pride never falters.

This Sept. 8, I am driving from school to cast a vote for Adam Hinds for state Senate because I know who he is and I believe that he is uniquely qualified to represent our entire community in Boston, alongside the rest of our tireless Berkshire delegation.

As a young person with a love for the place where I grew up, I think often on the question of what our region needs to cement a bright future. The Berkshires have incredible beauty, and even better people. But for what we have in character, we lack in many critical services. That is why this election is so important.

Since meeting Adam at a community gathering three years ago, I have gotten to know him not only as a selfless individual with a passion for our community, but as a friend. When I heard that he was running for state Senate, I knew I wanted to help his campaign. Since then, I have worked many hours to support his candidacy, and have learned some things.

When confronted with an issue, Adam does not simply say what sounds best; he does his homework. Adam consults experts locally, conducts research, and considers the unique features of our district. A good example of this is that he will not simply declare: "We need broadband" and leave it at that. He describes, in detail, the ways by which high-speed internet can be most effectively brought to each town, and what he can do as senator to make that happen more easily. Adam does not sweat the small stuff; he embraces it. That is a quality we both need and deserve from our elected officials.

No matter who it is for, I ask you to vote on Sept. 8. But if I am to make a recommendation, I ask for you to vote for the detail-oriented, kind, and extraordinarily-qualified community member who will set out a bright path for our future: Adam Hinds.

Jacob Edelman, Monterey

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“Campaigns spar over finance reports”
Money related to charter schools, climate change spark criticism
By Jim Therrien, The Berkshire Eagle, 9/2/2016

PITTSFIELD - Both legislative races in Berkshire County are producing campaign finance-related disputes as the House and Senate contests move closer to the Sept. 8 primary election.

Senate candidate Andrea Harrington sent a release critical of opponent Adam Hinds, calling on him to "return campaign contributions from Boston and out of state lobbyists representing large energy companies and big oil."

In her release, Harrington said of some of the contributions Hinds has received "came from lobbyists and top officials representing companies including ExxonMobil, the New England Power Generators Association, and Berkshire Gas."

She later cited two $100 contributions from employees of O'Neill & Associates, of Boston, which represents companies in the energy industry.

Hinds' campaign manager, Jason Ostrander, responded Friday that the campaign was not initially aware of the firm's link to the industry.

Harrington added, "I am deeply troubled that Adam Hinds has been raising money from Boston and out of state lobbyists representing big fossil fuel conglomerates. Our next state Senator needs to be prepared to stand up to these special interests and protect our environment and the natural beauty of our region."

In addition, Harrington stated, Hinds has "explicitly stated that he signed a pledge not to accept money from big energy ... It is concerning that he hasn't stuck to his word, and I hope that he will return these contributions immediately."

Hinds responded in an email: "A friend of mine works for Exxon-Mobil in Australia. This person is not a top official in the company. He was a grad school classmate of mine and we were in Baghdad together as well when I worked for the UN. He contributed to my campaign in March 2016 (not in his professional capacity, but because he is my friend and wanted to help from afar). This past Monday, August 29th, I proudly took a pledge with 350-Massachusetts to not accept money from big fossil fuel companies. I reviewed our donor list at that time and saw the potential conflict and returned my personal friend's money that day. The reporting period ended August 21st and therefore this action is not reflected in this report."

Hinds added, "Regarding a donation from an employee of Berkshire Gas, this is an individual who paid $50 to come to an event. It was unsolicited and he came in his personal capacity. I have been clear with him regarding my opposition to the [Kinder Morgan] pipeline as I have been with all voters consistently on this campaign.

What's important is I am serious about tackling climate change and accelerating the transition to renewable energy. That's why I signed the 350-Mass pledge and why I have made energy and the environment a central part of my campaign."

The two Democratic Senate candidates also are opposed by Rinaldo Del Gallo in the Sept. 8 primary.

Contact Jim Therrien at 413-496-6247. jtherrien@berkshireeagle.com @BE_therrien on Twitter.

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"State Senate races highlight otherwise low-key primary"
Thursday primary a departure from traditional voting day
By Bob Salsberg, The Associated Press via The Berkshire Eagle, 9/3/2016

BOSTON - Contests to fill the seats of three departing Democratic state senators are among the highlights of an unusual Thursday primary election in Massachusetts that has generated scant attention, largely because there are no statewide or other high-profile races.

None of the nine members of the state's all-Democratic U.S. House delegation face challenges within their own party, and Republicans are fielding candidates in only four districts. U.S. Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Edward Markey are not up for re-election this year and Republican Gov. Charlie Baker along with the state's other constitutional officers have more than two years remaining in their current terms.

Turnout for the Thursday primary could be further dampened by confusion over the election being held on Thursday, as Massachusetts voters are accustomed to going to the polls on a Tuesday. Secretary of State William Galvin did not want to schedule the election on Sept. 6, the day after Labor Day when many schools are reopening, and said moving the primary later into September would complicate absentee deadlines.

All 200 seats in the Legislature are up for grabs but many incumbents seeking re-election face little or no competition. Democrats should easily maintain their veto-proof majorities in both chambers for the next legislative session.

The most spirited races include those to succeed the departing Senate Democrats.

Sen. Brian Joyce leaves under a cloud after reports that he was being investigated for improperly using his legislative position to boost his private law practice. The Milton Democrat, who has denied wrongdoing, had his law office raided by federal agents in February.

State Rep. Walter Timilty and Nora Harrington, the chief operating officer of a behavioral health practice, are vying for the Democratic nomination to succeed Joyce. Both are from Milton. There are no Republican contenders, but the Democratic primary winner will face independent Jon Lott of Stoughton in November.

Three Democrats are vying for their party's nomination to fill the Berkshires Senate seat now held by Benjamin Downing: Rinaldo Del Gallo, a Pittsfield attorney; Andrea Harrington, an attorney from Richmond; and Adam Hinds, a community organizer and one-time aide to former U.S. Rep. John Olver.

The sole Republican candidate, Christine Canning, of Lanesborough, will face the Democratic winner in November.

Considered a rising star within the Democratic party, Downing surprised Beacon Hill with his decision to leave the Senate and pursue other interests.

Democratic and Republican contests will also be held Thursday in the Senate district that includes Cape Cod and the Islands. Sen. Dan Wolf, the co-founder of Cape Air, is leaving after three terms but hasn't ruled out a run for governor in 2018.

The Democratic contenders are: state Rep. Brian Mannal, of Barnstable; Julian Cyr, a former state public health official from Truro; and Sheila Lyons, a Barnstable County Commissioner from Wellfleet. Jim Crocker, a businessman from Barnstable and Anthony Schiavi, a retired U.S. Air Force brigadier general from Harwich, vie for the GOP nod.

A handful of House incumbents are also calling it quits, including long-time Democratic Rep. Benjamin Swan, of Springfield. His son, Benjamin Swan Jr., is one of four Springfield Democrats running for the seat. The others are City Councilor Bud Williams, former civic center commissioner Ken Barnett and Larry Lawson, who has run unsuccessfully for the seat in the past.

The state's lone congressional primary on Thursday is in the Ninth District, where Republicans Mark Alliegro, a scientist from Falmouth and Thomas O'Malley, a former U.S. Navy commander from Marshfield, are competing for their party's nomination and the opportunity to challenge incumbent Democratic U.S. Rep. William Keating in November.

The most crowded primary field is in the race for sheriff of Essex County, where five Democrats and six Republicans are vying for the fall ballot and a chance to succeed Republican Sheriff Frank Cousins, who is retiring.

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Rinaldo Del Gallo, III

Andrea Harrington

Adam Hinds

“State senate candidates come at progressive agenda via different routes”
By Jim Therrien, The Berkshire Eagle, 9/4/2016

PITTSFIELD - For the first time in a decade, Benjamin Downing's name will not be on the ballot for state Senate in the district that includes Berkshire County.

The Pittsfield Democrat did not seek re-election after five terms, but other Democrats and a Republican are vying to replace him. The Democrats — Rinaldo Del Gallo, of Lenox; Andrea Harrington, of Richmond; and Adam Hinds, of Pittsfield — are battling for their party's nomination in Thursday's primary.

Christine Canning, of Lanesborough, is unopposed for her party's nomination and will meet the Democratic winner in the Nov. 8 general election.

In the Democratic primary race, the three candidates have all stressed progressive views on the issues facing the district and the state — at times trying to claim the mantle of "the most progressive" in the race.

The candidates, who are profiled below, are seeking to represent a massive 52-community district that includes all of Berkshire County and towns in Franklin, Hampshire and Hampden counties.

RINALDO DEL GALLO III

Rinaldo Del Gallo III says it right out: "I am the anti-establishment candidate, no doubt about it," as he stated during a debate for the three Democratic candidates seeking to replace Downing.

The Lenox attorney, 53, also has stressed throughout his campaign, "My general theme is, I am running as a Bernie Sanders progressive ... It was one of the first decisions I made."

Although both his Democratic Primary opponents — Andrea Harrington and Adam Hinds — share similar progressive views of most major issues, Del Gallo asserts he has been out front first on those issues, and has never been shy about taking on the establishment view.

Often, he said, as with the push for a $15 minimum hourly wage, the fight against a Tennessee Gas Pipeline Co. plan for a cross-state natural gas line, and efforts to ban polystyrene foam containers and plastic shopping bags, decriminalize marijuana, push fatherhood rights and shared parenting, and transgender rights to use public restrooms, his views have become mainstream over time.

The Pittsfield native also has asserted that he's been a public figure in the Berkshires for 15 years, while he said Hinds was primarily working out of the Berkshires, and sometimes out of the country, and Harrington, also an attorney, hasn't been "visible" in the political limelight and has been largely absent from battles over major issues.

Del Gallo also touts his many newspaper columns, published in The Berkshire Eagle and other papers in the state as evidence that he is not afraid to take a public stand or push for change.

The candidate, who supported Sanders, the Vermont senator, in his run for the Democratic presidential nomination, said he believes the political revolution that movement began will now continue at the local and state levels and in Congress.

Like Sanders, Del Gallo said income disparity and the shift in recent decades of a disproportionate percentage of wealth toward the upper income levels, are at the base of other issues facing Massachusetts — including opioid addiction, poverty, a decline in spending on public education, and wage levels that do not support a chance at a middle class lifestyle.

He said he favors a graduated income tax — which 33 other states have — and the so-called "millionaire's tax" amendment proposal, or a higher rate for those with high incomes; a $15 an hour minimum wage and support for unions as they seek higher wages and benefits from employers.

Higher wages would give workers the disposable income to make purchases that would lead to more robust economic development, he said, noting that the 1950s through 1970s featured a more egalitarian economy in terms of the distribution of wealth and also strong growth, despite much higher tax rates on the wealthy and on corporations.

"I would submit that those were some of the most economically prosperous times in our county," Del Gallo said during an interview.

In addition, he supports a single-payer health care system; universal pre-K; tuition-free and debt-free state higher education; investment in green energy to replace fossil fuels and creating jobs in the Berkshires around that technology; investing in high-speed rail from the Berkshires to New York and Boston and improved public transportation; improving infrastructure, and the rapid expansion of high-speed internet in the smaller towns of the 52-community Berkshire-Franklin-Hampshire-Hampden Senate district.

On the environment, Del Gallo lists as accomplishments his proposals for a foam polystyrene food container ban in Pittsfield, which was passed as an ordinance, and for a ban on single-use plastic bags, which city officials are now reviewing. He received a Hero of the Ocean award from the state Senate for his efforts on the city's polystyrene ban.

For information, visit statesenate.rinaldodelgallo.com.

ANDREA HARRINGTON

Senate candidate Andrea Harrington, of Richmond, concedes she hasn't been as politically active as some others running for statewide office, but she tells voters: "There is really no one in this race who brings the kind of experience that I bring to this position."

That, she said, "is based on my experience of growing up here, seeing what our economy has gone through, coming from a working class family, having kids in the public schools, running a small business, and really advocating on behalf of my clients in the courts here every day I know I have the skills to be effective for the district in Boston."

Harrington is an attorney whose husband, Timothy Walsh, owns the Public Market in West Stockbridge; and she is a mother of two who says residents can count on her to fight to improve the lives of working people and families in Berkshire County.

Harrington advised potential constituents during one debate "not to let my size fool you," saying, "I am a fighter."

Until recently, voters were not as focused on Thursday's Democratic primary. Her campaign initially had been "a process of educating people," she said, "but I think people are starting to tune in now, and I am really, really happy with the response that I am getting."

In a 52-community Senate district, encompassing all or part of four counties, Harrington said it "definitely is a challenge. You can't knock on doors in every community." She said she's taking advantage of community or political events, especially in all the rural communities, not to mention meeting potential voters at transfer stations, "which is a good place to meet people."

Asked what she would like her legacy to be if elected, Harrington responded, "In 10 years or 20 years, when I look back and judge my performance as a state senator, I will judge it based on what did I do to stop the population decline and to turn that around, and what did I do to expand economic opportunity here in this district. Those are the biggest challenges, the most pressing issues and those feed into everything else."

She added that she doesn't believe "we have taken a districtwide or a countywide approach to economic development. But I see people starting to work toward that. I would like to take a systematic approach to economic development assess our strengths and weaknesses."

She said, "I would like to come up with a vision for economic development — what do we want the economy to look like in 10 years? And then take the steps to get there."

Her work with the board of BerkShares in South County "really influenced my thinking on the economy," she said of the organization, which tries to maximize the circulation of goods, services and capital within the region to bolster the local economy.

Like Downing, Harrington said she has a strong interest in promotion of sustainable energy. Education also is one of her top priorities, she said, "and my No. 1 legislative priority is universal preschool. It solves a host of problems."

Harrington said she represents many families in court and she see the effects of an inadequate education and many people who had negative experiences while in school.

Other key issues, she said, include moving to a $15 minimum wage and funding more treatment and support options in fighting opioid addiction. Harrington said she would push for a full-service hospital in North Adams and to preserve medical facilities in South County.

The Senate district is "the most progressive district in the state," she said. "I see the seat as an opportunity to really push the state in a progressive agenda."

Harrington grew up in Richmond and graduated from Taconic High School in Pittsfield in 1993. She is a 2003 graduate of American University's Washington College of Law, who returned to the area in 2007 after practicing in Florida.

For information, visit www.andreaforsenate.com.

ADAM HINDS

Adam Hinds believes his experience, growing up in Franklin County, working in Berkshire County's two cities and in the Middle East with the United Nations makes him the best qualified candidate to succeed Downing.

Hinds, 39, said during an interview that as a native of the Buckland-Shelburne area who has served in recent years as organizer and director of the Pittsfield Community Connection program to combat youth violence and gang influences, and as executive director of the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition, he has developed "a real understanding of the issues and the challenges" facing the district.

The candidate also cited as valuable experiences his work on the campaigns for former U.S. Rep. John Olver, and on U.S. Sen. John Kerry's 2004 presidential campaign, as well as his work with the U.N. for eight years prior to his return to Western Massachusetts to lead the Shannon grant-funded Pittsfield youth program in 2013-14.

Experience helping to negotiate power-sharing, cease-fire, boundary and other agreements between various groups or factions in the Middle East after the Iraq War will help him in working with political factions and issue stakeholders toward positive solutions, Hinds said.

He said he was told by supporters who urged him to run for the Senate seat, "We like that you have been very proactive in ensuring that all the various aspects of the population have been involved" in trying to address youth violence, addiction, poverty and other issues.

"That has been my model," he said, "ensuring that people understand the narrative and helping to define the narrative and proactively working with folks across the spectrum and to demonstrate action. That's what we have done and what I've done since I came back, and pretty much what I've done in my career."

On legislative and social issues facing Massachusetts, Hinds said "the top issue is jobs, jobs, jobs," to which he would add "energy and the environment, education, and basic infrastructure and transportation."

Closing "the digital divide" separating rural towns in the region from other areas of the state in terms of broadband access has to be a priority, he said, along with ensuring a fair share of funding for transportation infrastructure projects in the region.

Those issues, along with education funding — including vocational education and workforce training — directly impact the local economy, Hinds said, and the ability to attract new businesses and other development.

He said he would push for changes in the state aid formulas for Chapter 70 aid to school districts. Hinds said he opposes the November ballot question seeking to expand the charter school system.

Workforce training funding is key to filling many of the more than 1,000 jobs in the region that are open at a given time, he said.

On energy, Hinds said he favors greater efforts to diversify the region's energy sources, specifically lowering its reliance on natural gas in favor of renewable energy.

Hinds said his work with youth and low-income residents also has given him an understanding of the opioid addiction crisis that is devastating communities across the state.

"It's true there is no shortage of challenges," he said, "but I also think there is an endless stream of opportunity."

Hinds is a 1998 graduate of Wesleyan University and of the Tufts University Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy.

For information, visit www.adamhinds.org.

Contact Jim Therrien at 413-496-6247. jtherrien@berkshireeagle.com @BE_therrien on Twitter.

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Republican State Senate candidate Chris Canning introduces herself. The event was hosted by the Rainbow Seniors organization at the Berkshire Athenaeum in Pittsfield. September 4, 2016.

Candidates for the state Senate and state Representative offices gather to introduce themselves and meet members of the LGBTQ and senior communities. September 4, 2016.
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Our Opinion: “Hinds is choice in key Senate race”
The Berkshire Eagle, Editorial, 9/4/2016

Much of Western Massachusetts, including the Berkshires, will suffer a blow when effective and influential state Senator Ben Downing steps down. The important process of replacing him begins September 8.

Adam Hinds, Andrea Harrington and Rinaldo Del Gallo, III will vie for the Democratic nomination that day. The winner will face Republican Christine Canning in November.

A native of Buckland, Mr. Hinds came to the attention of Berkshire residents when he formed the Pittsfield Community Connection, a program to get to at-risk youth before gangs do. His work as director of the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition put him on the front lines of issues related to jobs and the county's opioid addiction problem.

A Berkshire attorney and Richmond native, Ms. Harrington has deep family roots in the Berkshires. Her experience representing indigent criminal defendants in the county and state should make her a progressive voice on Beacon Hill for low- and middle-income individuals and families. Ms. Harrington and her husband own the Public Market in West Stockbridge, which gives her additional insight into economic issues affecting small businesses.

Mr. Del Gallo, a Pittsfield-based attorney, has been active in the county on progressive issues, such as bans on polystyrene foam containers. He is running as a "Bernie Sanders progressive," and as such is advocating middle class issues like raising the minimum wage. Like Senator Sanders, however, he has advocated simplistic, unrealistic wealth distribution arguments that apply only indirectly to the district.

Mr. Hinds came to the Berkshires following 10 years with the United Nations working for progress toward peace in Middle Eastern hot spots. That kind of problem-solving experience should translate to success in the Legislature, where the ability to work through an often Byzantine process is critical. His activism on educational and young adult issues in the Berkshires speaks to his concern for the region and his knowledge of important issues.

All the candidates would advocate traditional Democratic issues, but the variety of Mr. Hinds' experiences are unique. He would seem to have the best chance of evolving into a state senator along the lines of Senator Downing, who has shown versatility in taking the lead in Boston on a variety of issues important to the region. The Eagle endorses Adam Hinds for the Democratic nomination for state Senate from Western Massachusetts.

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Christine Canning: “It is your voice and your vote”
By Christine Canning, Op-Ed, The Berkshire Eagle, 9/2/2016

LANESBOROUGH - As your next state senator, I am about business, education, jobs, health care, and growing this economy. Hands down, any opponent from the party who wins Sept. 8 cannot touch my credentials, expertise, education or work experience.

As I am a straight shooter, we need to have a rich and deep discussion about our economy. We need stimulus to attract work and jobs, and this is my goal. Together we will be proactive in repurposing and remarketing our infrastructure.

In conjunction with an economist, I derived a 15-point action plan to stimulate tax dollars back into our area with long-term, sustainable goals that will attract professional, mid-level, skilled and unskilled employment. Our plan has depth. We are Tax-achusetts, but we don't have to be. Our tax system is actually crippling our economy.

Local Democrat legislators have been so good at creating "benefits" that people from other states come over the borders to take advantage of our wonderful packages. Our elderly, veterans, and others have trouble getting affordable health care, but an illegal immigrant in Massachusetts has an avenue of protection. That is absurd, and I have a laundry list of changes to benefit taxpayers ready to put into action.

Those who pay into our tax system are taxed to the fullest. Those who pay in the bare minimum are rewarded with $5,000 back from the commonwealth. We've lost common sense. We are led by people who don't have real plans for our area. Every day, under the current leadership, it feels like a Band-aid being plastered on a gushing wound.

Change needs to start with me and you. Easily and effortlessly, you can vote me into office. I will fix this mess. I understand that those benefits are supposed to help people during a difficult period. They were never meant to supplant working. Our "Tax-achusetts" system should be offering a hand up and not a hand out.

Taxes are too numerous and are too high. Taxes penalize and decentivize the critical economic activity that can make Massachusetts viable and competitive again. To keep critical services funded and ease tax burdens on the citizens of Massachusetts the primary goal must be to eliminate unnecessary taxes that penalize select individuals and groups. I firmly believe that the key to reviving the state economy is to introduce the concept of tax competition within the state.

Similar to competition in the marketplace for goods and services, tax competition incentivizes the individual municipalities to keep the tax burdens low lest they lose businesses and residents. Local options to tax certain things must be preserved, but many statewide taxes must be eliminated.

This means revising the "personal income" and "fiduciary income tax," specifically net capital gains, dividends and interest. The federal government already taxes corporate incomes, and then it taxes the dividends and the capital gains on the shares of stock.

By engaging in triple taxation (the federal government taxation of dividends and capital gains being held as the second layer) of these assets, the state is crippling itself in a race against states that do not impose such measures. The punitive measures on the needed capital to get the economy moving again must end.

Another scenario that falls clearly under those constraints is our current resident and non-resident estate tax. To attract and maintain long-term residents, we must not penalize the life's work of productive citizens. A third party, in this case Massachusetts, should not be heir to the fortunes of those who work for their family's well-being and future. As the tax stands, it is one more reason to move out of the state during your golden years.

For our working poor who have nothing left to give "Tax-achusetts," we need to revisit taxes on alcohol and cigarettes. If the disaster of the National Prohibition Act taught us anything, it is that people are going to drink regardless of what the law says. The idea of using excise taxes to dissuade consumption of alcohol is the modern descendent of the XVIII Amendment. All this adds to the lives of citizens is higher prices and more complications for the producers and sellers.

The key to dissuasion to drink is to educate people on the dangers of intoxication and enforcing personal responsibility by punishing those who are intoxicated, not higher prices and red tape. Taxes on cigarettes tend to incentivize crime. Butt-legging is a practice where a person will go to a state with lower taxes on cigarettes (like New Hampshire) and buy cartons there, transport them back to Massachusetts and either sell them illegally on their own.

Your vote is your voice. Elect me, the proven voice of change. With your vote I will become the next state senator from Western Massachusetts.

Christine Canning is a Republican candidate for state senator.

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Andrea Harrington: “An independent senator for Berkshires”
By Andrea Harrington, Op-Ed, The Berkshire Eagle, 9/4/2016

RICHMOND - In a few days, residents of 52 cities and towns in Western Massachusetts have an important decision to make as they elect their Democratic nominee for the state Senate. This election will have major implications on our region and there are clear differences between the three candidates running.

I am asking for your vote because I have the experience and background to be a bold, independent voice for working families and seniors in the Berkshires. As your state senator, you will always be able count on me to put our residents and our communities first.

Since announcing my candidacy in March, I have knocked on thousands of doors and run a true grassroots campaign across four counties in the largest state Senate district in Massachusetts. Here, I've met countless people who share the same struggles and triumphs that my family and I have encountered.

I grew up in a working family — my mom was a housekeeper from Pittsfield and my dad a carpenter from a small town in the Berkshires. My parents raised me to work and study hard and gave me opportunities that they never had. I graduated from Taconic High School and went on to become the first person in my family to go to college and then law school.

After working to overturn death penalty cases, I returned to the town where I grew up to raise a family with my husband, Tim. I started my own local law practice and Tim and I started a small business in West Stockbridge.

For more than a decade, I've been working on behalf of families as an attorney in the Berkshires. As good jobs have been leaving our region, I have seen firsthand the challenges caused by population decline, a shrinking middle class, seniors struggling to stay in their homes, and a devastating opiate crisis impacting thousands of our friends, family, and neighbors.

INVESTED IN BERKSHIRES

My experience is right here in the Berkshires working on issues that matter to Western Massachusetts. In addition to running a small business, I've served on the school council for my local school district, the affordable housing commission in my town, as delegate to the Democratic state convention, and as a board member of local non-profit organizations. I am not running for office as a stepping-stone for higher office. I'm running because I am deeply invested in the Berkshires, and I feel an obligation to do more for our region.

I have outlined a detailed platform and list of my priorities for how I think we can strengthen our communities and our region to provide greater opportunities for residents. I hope you'll take a moment to read this on my website at www.andreaforsenate.com or on the flyer I mailed out to Berkshire voters this week.

In addition to having the right priorities and the experience, I believe that I am the candidate with the independence to always put our people first. Sadly, outside money has been pouring into politics from SuperPACs, lobbyists, and Beacon Hill insiders. These special interests have made it clear that I am not their candidate.

The same goes for supporters of the Kinder-Morgan pipeline and executives at Berkshire Health Systems — they are raising money for another candidate in this campaign. That's fine by me!

In the current political culture, too many people feel disconnected because they can't make big political contributions or don't know the right people to call. I'm running for State Senate, because I want to be a voice for our residents who do the real work to enhance and support our communities every day. I want to be an advocate for working families, single parents raising their children here, and seniors who have invested decades building and giving back to our communities.

I want to stand up for those who coach youth sports, volunteer at senior centers, and serve on local boards and commissions. I want to work to create jobs and opportunity for those who can't find work in our region. I want to increase access to treatment beds for those struggling with addiction. And, I want to stand up to protect the natural beauty of Western Massachusetts from gas pipelines and toxic waste dumps.

On Thursday, I hope to earn your vote. I can assure you that there is no one who will harder for you in the Massachusetts state Senate.

Andrea Harrington is a Democratic candidate for state senator from Western Massachusetts.

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Rinaldo Del Gallo, III: “A true progressive for state Senate”
By Rinaldo Del Gallo, III, Op-Ed, The Berkshire Eagle, 9/5/2016

PITTSFIELD - I differ from my opponents for state Senate as follows:

I am running as a "Bernie Sanders progressive." They declined to say whether they voted for Bernie Sanders or Hillary Clinton when asked by a debate moderator. They figure you are not entitled to know how they fall on the political spectrum.

They were initially undecided about whether to oppose the pipelines. This shows that they had reservations about upsetting the pipelines' advocates. They only opposed the pipelines after I jumped in the race and opposed the pipelines from the start.

PRO-WIND POWER

To fight against global warming, which could literally cause the cataclysmic end of mankind, I am for having wind energy here in the Berkshires (and the rest of the district) by having windmills on our mountain ranges. They are opposed to such Berkshire windmills. In 2008 I wrote a column supporting the Wind Sitting Reform Act in this newspaper, streamlining the permitting process for windmills. The Eagle agreed in an editorial.

My opponents are progressive, but not as progressive as I am. They do not claim to want to follow the Nordic Model, which is the economic and social policies of the Nordic countries where homelessness and poverty is almost unknown. I am for tuition-free and debt-free state universities and colleges: they have never voiced support for such programs.

I favor legalizing marijuana to which they have repeatedly said they oppose. While to their credit both have said they want to expand opioid treatment, neither have gone to the extent that I have and declared the war on drugs a failure and call for a 100 percent focus on treatment instead of enforcement.

Andrea Harrington and I both favor an immediate and across the board $15 minimum wage. Adam Hinds initially supported this when at a forum in Becket, but at a forum at MCLA said he was for a $15 minimum wage "eventually" and there would be "lots of exceptions." Andrea and I both maintain he flip-flopped.

We have vastly different views on direct democracy. Whether it is legalizing marijuana or lifting the cap on charter schools or any other ballot initiative, I have said I would honor the will of the people no matter how the vote turns out. Despite countless opportunities to say they will support the will of the people however any initiative vote turns out, and despite my open challenge in a debate that they pledge to support the will of the people no matter the vote, they refused.

On the issue of crime, both my opponents immediately called for more spending on police after a rash of shooting in Pittsfield. I did not — I would rather the money be spent on creating hope and opportunity for our youth to keep them from going criminal in the first place.

While Hinds and Harrington spoke against money in politics, both refused to agree to my challenge to voluntary spending limits. Lately, both the media and Harrington have been questioning many of Hinds' campaign donors which the public should look into.

Opposed to Walmart plan

We all want high speed internet in the hill towns, but I am the only one calling on the government to do what the private sector will not: I liken the problem to that of rural electricity. On the issue of Walmart at PEDA, my opponents have observed that Walmart is not a great employer and wreaks economic devastation on municipalities, yet fail to criticize the city of Pittsfield for welcoming Walmart to PEDA. I am opposed to Walmart at PEDA.

On the question of shared parenting legislation, which is a legal presumption that there would be joint legal and physical custody of children in child custody cases, which may be rebutted by showing that one of the parents is unfit or it unworkable through no fault of the parents, Hinds declined to answer the question at a debate. Harrington said she is in favor of a "maternal preference," whereby fathers and mothers would not be treated equally before the eyes of the court, but instead favor mothers over fathers. The public should know that virtually nobody in the legal profession supports this position (even opponents to shared parenting legislation), and that most states have ruled that such a maternal preference violates Equal Protection and that father and mother must be treated equally.

While after 4-5 months my opponents finally supported the Fair Share Amendment, none have supported amending the state Constitution to call for taxes on the super rich with regard to capital gains, wealth accumulation, and estates. Currently, the top 1/10 of 1 percent has as much wealth as the bottom 90 percent. I call on changing this to finance education, infrastructure, green energy and health care.

Rinaldo Del Gallo, III is a candidate for state Senate from Western Massachusetts.

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Letter: “Attacks on Hinds are dirty politics”
The Berkshire Eagle, 9/5/2016

To the editor:

I recently received a robocall from state Senate candidate Andrea Harrington, a Democrat running in the Sept. 8 primary. Harrington claims Adam Hinds is accepting big corporate energy money from Boston lobbyists, out-of-state lobbyists and top officials representing companies such as Exxon Mobil.

Let's take a closer look. Mr. Hinds did receive a personal, not corporate, donation from a friend who now happens to work for Exxon Mobil in Australia. Years ago they worked together for the U.N. in Baghdad. The two are graduate school classmates and longtime friends. That donation has been returned to avoid any appearance of impropriety.

Hinds did have $50 come into his campaign fund from an employee of Berkshire Gas. This was the cost of a specific Hinds campaign event. It was unsolicited and came from the personal, not corporate, account of that employee of Berkshire Gas. Adam has always been clear with this person regarding his opposition to the pipeline.

I believe the robocall from Harrington is dirty politics late in the campaign. I have followed this campaign very closely. To witness Harrington going negative this late in the race is a disservice to everyone including herself. She had months to make such charges but she waited until it is so late in the game that there is no time to fairly respond to such accusations.

Hinds has clearly shown himself to be head and shoulders above his two opponents. He has earned and will receive my vote in the primary for state Senate on Thursday.

Jim Edelman, Monterey

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Letter: “Hinds is a product of Pittsfield machine”
The Berkshire Eagle, 9/5/2016

To the editor:

I support Andrea Harrington for state senator. There are many reasons why, but here are some of them.

Adam Hinds is part of the political machine of Pittsfield. He worked for Rep. Olver and Sen. Kerry, which means he is also part of the political machine of Washington, D.C.

So it is not surprising that he accepted money from Exxon Mobil, Berkshire Gas, Kinder-Morgan, the New England Power Generator Assoc. and out-of-state lobbyists representing fossil fuel conglomerates.

Hinds has only been here for a few years and has only worked for Berkshire political machine organizations. He has no stake in the welfare of Berkshire residents. He will do what the lobbyists tell him to do.

Harrington has lived here for decades. She has children in school here. She is an accomplished lawyer. She has served on committees and other groups that have benefitted Berkshire residents for many years.

On Thursday, let us break the political machine of Pittsfield. Oil and coal power generating companies may control Washington, D.C., but they do not control us!

Thomas Marini, Pittsfield

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Letter: “Harrington is committed for the long haul”
The Berkshire Eagle, 9/5/2016

To the editor:

On Thursday, Democrats face an important choice in the state Senatorial primary race. Of the three candidates on the primary ballot — and I have seen, heard, and spoken with all three several times — Andrea Harrington is the one with whom I am most impressed, feeling confident that she would represent our district boldly and most effectively — and would do so long enough to make a difference.

Of the other two Democratic candidates, I am most concerned about Mr. Hinds, whose recent jobs in Central and North County have been of very brief tenure. Yes, he grew up in the district (Buckland), but his earliest work, according to his publicity, has been pretty far afield. If he spent most of his first 10 working years with the United Nations in the Middle East, I wonder how long he'd remain in the state Senate once the office of U.S. representative opens up.

As for Mr. Del Gallo, I have seen him, until recently, as a fathers' rights spokesperson — a rather narrow focus.

Yes, we are fortunate to have these choices to replace Sen. Downing, who has served this district so well I don't need to stress how important this post is to this western-most region in the state.

As a former public official and political activist, I will cast my vote for Andrea Harrington, who speaks clearly on the issues facing this district, whose values and priorities match my own, and who would likely serve long enough to make a real difference for this district in the state Senate.

Since we are conditioned to vote on Tuesday, I hope folks will join me on Thursday, to vote for Andrea Harrington for state Senate.

Diane M. Gallese-Parsons, North Adams

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Letter: “Hinds has necessary skills, experience”
The Berkshire Eagle, 9/6/2016

To the editor:

Ben Downing has been a great state Senator. Among other things, he knew what to focus on and what it took to get things done.

For a Democrat, it is important to be a strong advocate for progressive issues like workers' rights, job development, a higher minimum wage, progressive taxation, better public school funding, environmental protection, pro-choice, expanded broadband, small business relief, and so much more.

Only one candidate has the experience and organizing skills necessary to get things done for the Berkshires: Adam Hinds.

A graduate of Wesleyan University and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, Adam studied the critical work skills he would need to get things done. He then practiced those skills in the toughest region of the world to do so: in the Middle East with the UN. Then he returned to the Berkshires to start the Pittsfield Community Connection, a program designed to engage at-risk youth before their exposure to and engagement in violence and crime and worked with Pittsfield City officials to win a grant that "will bring up to $5 million to Pittsfield to move young men engaged in illegal activities towards education, jobs, and counseling."

When Adam moved on to take the position of executive director of the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition, he immediately started building a coalition of business leaders, community advocates, job development agencies and our local colleges. The goal: to bring men and women who are struggling to get a job into the workforce. "Employ North Berkshire" will be a template for use throughout the county.

I have worked with Adam. Only Adam can be another Ben Downing. Only Adam has the skills, abilities and experience to bring meaningful change and progress to our Berkshires.

Showing a lack of experience, one of his opponents recently accused Adam of taking money from big corporate lobbyists. As it turns out, she was terribly misleading.

One donor of $250 was a college classmate who donated as a friend (not a lobbyist) and because he works for Exxon Mobil, Adam had returned the contribution before his opponent's complaint. Another contribution came from someone who attended a community meet and greet and works for Berkshire Gas — the amount: $50. To suggest that Adam is therefore in the pockets of the energy industry is absurd and desperate.

Vote for Adam Hinds: a community builder, a change agent, a workhorse for us all.

Sherwood Guernsey, Williamstown
The writer is a former state legislator.

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Letter: “Harrington will speak for those who need help”
The Berkshire Eagle, 9/6/2016

To the editor:

The state Senate race reminds me of the lyrics to an old spiritual song I love: "I'm just a nobody; trying to tell everybody; about somebody; who's about helping everybody!" Which is why I will be casting my vote Thursday for Andrea Harrington.

I believe Andrea is the right person to represent Western Mass. and the Berkshires specifically. Andrea will be that voice that speaks for all because she knows what it is like to struggle; to grow up with limited resources, much like so many of us in this community.

As a small business owner, Andrea understands that it is the small business owner that keeps the economy of our communities strong and people working. As a mom she has been active in her local school council, and she understands how important a quality education is for all youth. She knows that it is cheaper to educate, than it is to incarcerate.

I attended Andrea's state Senate campaign launch event. It was there that I learned of the work that she had done here and in Florida as an attorney. Andrea has a clear track record of commitment to social justice. She is no "Johnny-Come-Lately" motivated by access to power and looking to make a name for herself. Andrea is a woman who knows how to practice what she preaches.

I also respect the fact that she is an independent candidate, unfettered by political alliances and special interests, which have been such a destructive force for our community. She will be a free independent voice for all citizens. We need this now more than ever.

Dennis L. Powell, Pittsfield

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Letter: “Hinds addresses issues in collaborative fashion”
The Berkshire Eagle, 9/6/2016

To the editor:

Not long after Adam Hinds became the director of the Pittsfield Community Connection working with Pittsfield's at risk youth, we ran into each other at a Berkshire Democratic Party BBQ. We reminisced about campaigns we had both worked on including re-elections for Rep. Olver and Sen. Kerry's presidential run. After this we started running into each other often and all over Berkshire County. We had discussions on workforce development and challenges, arts, culture, the opioid epidemic and numerous other topics. Every one of these discussions showed me Adam's grasp of how each is impacting our area.

During Adam's time with the Pittsfield Community Connection I was impressed with how he connected with people in our community and how they rallied around the work that he was facilitating and his leadership style. He was able to recruit a team and launch a program that is still helping Pittsfield today.

When Adam was chosen to be the executive director of the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition I was able to see him build relationships and have a positive effect, same as he did in Pittsfield. With both organizations I witnessed him facilitate meetings on difficult topics and have people leave feeling hopeful that they could affect change by working together. This is what I want to see in our next state senator, someone who has proven to be able to bring people together to solve problems.

As an at Large Pittsfield city councilor, a proud union member and lifelong Berkshire County resident, I want Adam Hinds on the team representing us in Boston. He understands the issues facing our district because he has been working with us for years. Please join me in voting for Adam Hinds on Thursday in the Democratic primary.

Pete White, Pittsfield
The writer is an at large city councilor.

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Letter: “Harrington an example of a hard-working mom”
The Berkshire Eagle, 9/6/2016

To the editor:

Andrea Harrington is a colleague and a friend, and I encourage everyone reading this to vote for her, especially working moms like Andrea.

I have peripherally watched campaign covered in the local media and thought it all pretty standard until I read that an opponent said she's been "invisible." I know Andrea as a fierce and brilliant litigator, community volunteer, but most importantly, as a mother of two boys. I have seen her in action at work and with her family.

I am not a huge feminist, but I do run a law practice and I have been an elected official in the Berkshires and quickly noted the subtle sexism in calling a female candidate "invisible." Women of Berkshire County, please take note that your work as a mother and employee makes you "invisible" to Andrea's opponent. You are not invisible. How many of us working moms get up early to get our children ready for school or day care and prepare their lunches while attempting to get ready for work ourselves? We work all day and come home to prepare dinner, do homework, give baths, play games, and do a bedtime routine. If Andrea were a male candidate, she would have been lauded for her successful law practice while being a "family man."

Andrea does not attend gratuitous political events, and maybe that is why she was deemed "invisible." Working mothers do not have time for nonsense, hand-shaking, back-slapping or pointless exercises in local politics. Working mothers work. Andrea works at everything she does and she's a success. She's a phenomenal attorney, a smart businesswoman, and a great mother and wife.

If you want a poised, brilliant, family-oriented, and driven leader in Boston, vote for Andrea Harrington.

Jennifer M. Breen, North Adams
The writer is an attorney and former North Adams city councilor.

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After learning of his Democratic State Senate primary win, Adam Hinds celebrates with his supporters at Hotel on North in Pittsfield on Thursday. (Stephanie Zollshan — The Berkshire Eagle | photos.berkshireeagle.com)

“Hinds wins Democratic spot on ticket”
State Senate: Will face Republican Canning in general election as he fights to wins former Sen. Downing's seat
By Jim Therrien, The Berkshire Eagle, 9/8/2016

PITTSFIELD - In the state Senate race, Adam Hinds built a solid early lead in the three-way Democratic Primary and handily defeated his two challengers.

Hinds, of Pittsfield, defeated attorney Andrea Harrington of Richmond, who finished second, and attorney Rinaldo Del Gallo of Lenox, who was a distant third.

In Berkshire County, Hinds received 6,695 votes to 5,024 for Harrington and 901 for Del Gallo.

Hinds now will face Republican Christine Canning in the Nov. 8 general election. Canning, of Lanesborough, was unopposed in that party's primary.

Incumbent Sen. Ben Downing, D-Pittsfield, did not seek re-election after five terms.

"It feels great," said Hinds, during his post-election party Thursday night at Hotel on North. "A lot of hard work got us across the finish line."

Hinds said Harrington had called him to congratulate him on his victory in the primary.

"I am thrilled that we have the opportunity to continue sending a strong message in Western Mass. for working families, energy and [other issues]," Hinds said. "We also want to do politics differently and stick to our message. I want to be defined by bringing people together to get things done, in contrast to the divisiveness on the national level."

At his boisterous election party, Hinds said there were "a lot of people here who worked a lot of hours and they deserve to have some fun."

Hinds has been on leave from his job as executive director of the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition in North Adams. He said he now is considering his first weekend off after seven months of campaigning.

The Democratic nominee built an early and eventually insurmountable lead over Harrington as the vote was slowly counted in the massive 52-community Senate district. After a boost from his hometown of Pittsfield, Hinds maintained about 55 percent of the total vote as the results trickled in throughout the night.

Harrington hovered at about 38 to 39 percent, with Del Gallo trailing with about 7 to 8 percent.

In Pittsfield, Hinds received 2,878 votes to 1,924 for Harrington and 434 for Del Gallo.

The Senate district includes all of Berkshire County's 32 communities and towns in Franklin, Hampshire and Hampden counties.

Hinds won Pittsfield, the district's largest community, with a solid but not overwhelming margin, winning in every precinct with about 55 percent of the city vote. He also won in North Adams, while Harrington was strongest in several towns in South County, such as Great Barrington, Lee, Richmond and West Stockbridge.

Hinds, 40, said during the race that as a native of the Buckland-Shelburne area who has served in recent years as organizer of the Pittsfield Community Connection program to combat youth violence and gang influences, and as executive director of the NBCC, he has developed "a real understanding of the issues and the challenges" facing the district.

He had grown up in Franklin County, worked recently in Berkshire County's two cities and had earlier worked in the Middle East with the United Nations. That combination of experiences made him the best qualified to succeed Downing, Hinds contended.

The candidate also cited his experience in helping to negotiate power-sharing, cease-fire and other agreements between factions in the Middle East after the Iraq War, saying that would help him in working with political factions toward positive solutions.

"That has been my model," the candidate said during an interview, "ensuring that people understand the narrative and helping to define the narrative and proactively working with folks across the spectrum and to demonstrate action. That's what we have done and what I've done since I came back, and pretty much what I've done in my career."

Harrington is an attorney whose husband, Timothy Walsh, owns the Public Market in West Stockbridge. Harrington said she wanted to fight to improve the lives of working people and families in Berkshire County.

She grew up in Richmond and graduated from Taconic High School in Pittsfield in 1993. Harrington is a 2003 graduate of American University's Washington College of Law, who returned to the area in 2007 after practicing in Florida.

In the primary race, which included more than a half-dozen debates, all three candidates stressed progressive views on the issues facing the district and the state. Del Gallo in many instances drove the debate topics, saying he wanted to run as a Bernie Sanders progressive and asserting that he has been out front first on those issues.

Contact Jim Therrien at 413-496-6247. jtherrien@berkshireeagle.com @BE_therrien on Twitter.

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“Challengers present choices: ....; Republican Canning running against Hinds”
By Jim Therrien, The Berkshire Eagle, 9/10/2016

PITTSFIELD - With the dust settling from the Democratic primary races for state House and Senate, independent 3rd District House candidate Christopher Connell and Republican Senate candidate Christine Canning are gearing up for the final push to the Nov. 8 election.

Canning, of Lanesborough, is facing Democratic primary winner Adam Hinds of Pittsfield for the Senate seat being vacated by Sen. Ben Downing.

CHRISTINE CANNING

Canning has expressed frustration at feeling somewhat left out during the primary campaign season, when she was unopposed for the GOP nomination and Democratic races hogged the spotlight. But she kept busy meeting with small groups, public officials and individuals around the 52-community Senate district to explain her self-described "moderate views" and lack of a hardline philosophical bent on issues.

The Republican nominee acknowledged she faces a "David and Goliath" situation in running against the Democrat Hinds, who she said already is outspending her by more than 10 to 1. Her expenditures to date are around $3,400, she said.

"Personally, I think it's a machine," she said of the Democrats supporting Hinds. "I don't believe in machines."

Canning said she will instead count on the support she's found among voters from across the political spectrum, which she attributed to her practical approach to solving problems by searching for the best and most efficient solutions.

"My team has some socialists," she said. "Some are on the right; lots of them are Democrats and many are libertarians."

Ultimately, she said, "I'm very moderate; I'm not philosophical on party; I'm all about human beings."

Noting some of her positions on issues, Canning said she supports gay rights, is "pro children and education," would fight age discrimination and calls for more effort to combat domestic abuse." She also is pro-life on abortion and supports gun owner rights against the efforts by Attorney General Maura Healey to strictly enforce the state's ban on assault-style firearms.

She also favors some form of legalization of marijuana for adults, in part because that could boost the production of hemp, which Canning believes could be an important agricultural product in Western Massachusetts. And she favors more flexibility on inheritance requirements for the transfer to the next generation of farm properties that are under a conservation restriction barring development.

Canning said she also is someone who has pointed out mismanagement or regulatory lapses while working in public education positions in the region and is good at analyzing funding systems and other government programs with an eye toward improving them.

"I go after fraud," she said, "and I don't back down."

Among areas where Canning said the state is wasting or misspending tax revenue are in the MassHealth, or state Medicaid program, where she said it is not difficult enough for out-of-state residents who sign up for benefits in Massachusetts, and where unnecessary trips to the emergency room, rather than a less expensive care facility, remain a costly problem.

The candidate also opposes the current public student testing system, which she said could be replaced with a portfolio-based system at less cost, and allow more funding for teacher salaries; and she calls for budgeting changes at the state government level to allow bonuses for department heads who find ways to hold down spending in specific line items, while not necessarily reducing their budgets for the next fiscal year.

Communities, especially cities like North Adams and Pittsfield within the Senate district are "near bankruptcy," Canning said, and in dire need of economic development and a state aid formula that provides more assistance and also operates more efficiently.

Canning said she is finishing a 15-point economic development plan that will be posted on her website, canning4senate.com, which is expected to launch over the coming week.

She added that she has spoken with Hinds and both agreed to keep the campaign's tone at a high level and not slip into a "he said, she said" debate.

Canning is CEO of New England Global Network LLC, an education consulting firm, and develops curriculum and educational training manuals, books and other materials, often under state or federal contracts, including for the State Department involving foreign nations.

Contact Jim Therrien at 413-496-6247. jtherrien@berkshireeagle.com @BE_therrien on Twitter.

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Letter: “Troubled by Canning's opinions on issues”
The Berkshire Eagle, Letter to the Editor, 9/12/2016

To the editor:

I read Christine Canning's Sept. 2 op-ed column as to why we in Western Massachusetts should elect her to serve as our state senator. I was troubled by several issues that she discusses, which I believe to be either inaccurate or exaggerated.

For example, referring to Massachusetts as Taxachusetts. I did some research and found there are seven states with higher per capita taxes than Massachusetts. They are in order of highest: New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, California, Wisconsin, Rhode Island and Minnesota, followed by Massachusetts, Maine and Pennsylvania.

Most of the states with the lowest tax burden such as Alaska, Wyoming, North Dakota and others, receive much of their revenue from what is considered out-of-state revenue. For example taxes on energy companies.

In addition I would ask Ms. Canning if she has checked the quality of the education systems in states with a low tax burden? Many of those states have some of the poorest rated school districts in the country, whereas Massachusetts has some of the highest rated school districts and as a state is at or near the top.

I do not like to say this, but some of her statements have some similarity to Donald Trump. Ms. Canning states what she believes is wrong in our commonwealth (and I do not disagree with her on some issues), however she does not lay out a specific plan to address the issues. She states she will fix it! Sound familiar? And for better or worse she will be working with a Democratic majority of senators who may or may not chose to listen to her ideas, although would I hope there can be a "reaching across the aisle."

I disagree with her position against taxing liquor and cigarettes. The use of these items is a choice made by individuals. If individuals choose to use either or both it is a choice. No one is forcing one to smoke or drink alcoholic beverages. Cigarettes are a known cause of cancer and heart attacks. This is known and people still continue to smoke, and over use of alcohol has its own set of health issues. I do not smoke, but I am more than willing to pay taxes for my glass of wine!

Susan Wismer, Pittsfield

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About Me

My photo
Amherst, NH, United States
I am a citizen defending the people against corrupt Pols who only serve their Corporate Elite masters, not the people! / My 2 political enemies are Andrea F. Nuciforo, Jr., nicknamed "Luciforo" and former Berkshire County Sheriff Carmen C. Massimiano, Jr. / I have also pasted many of my political essays on "The Berkshire Blog": berkshireeagle.blogspot.com / I AM THE ANTI-FRANK GUINTA! / Please contact me at jonathan_a_melle@yahoo.com

50th Anniversary - 2009

50th Anniversary - 2009
The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame on Columbus Avenue in Springfield, Massachusetts.

Pittsfield Politics: Capitanio, Mazzeo agree on budget cuts, public safety

Pittsfield Politics: Capitanio, Mazzeo agree on budget cuts, public safety
Paul Capitanio, left, speaks during Monday night's Ward 3 City Council debate with fellow candidate Melissa Mazzeo at Pittsfield Community Television's studio. The special election (3/31/2009) will be held a week from today (3/24/2009). The local issues ranged from economic development and cleaning up blighted areas in Ward 3 to public education and the continued remediation of PCB's.

Red Sox v Yankees

Red Sox v Yankees
Go Red Sox!

Outrage swells in Congress!

Outrage swells in Congress!
Senate Banking Committee Chairman Sen. Christopher Dodd, D-Conn., left, and the committee's ranking Republican Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., listen during a hearing on modernizing insurance regulations, Tuesday, March 17, 2009, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh). - http://news.yahoo.com/s/politico/20090318/pl_politico/30833

Beacon Hill's $pecial Interest Tax Raisers & $PENDERS!

Beacon Hill's $pecial Interest Tax Raisers & $PENDERS!
Photo Gallery: www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2009/03/15/St_Patricks_Day_Boston/

The path away from Wall Street ...

The path away from Wall Street ...
...Employers in the finance sector - traditionally a prime landing spot for college seniors, particularly in the Northeast - expect to have 71 percent fewer jobs to offer this year's (2009) graduates.

Economic collapse puts graduates on unforeseen paths: Enrollment in public service jobs rising...

Economic collapse puts graduates on unforeseen paths: Enrollment in public service jobs rising...
www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2009/03/14/economic_collapse_puts_graduates_on_unforeseen_paths/

Bank of America CEO Ken Lewis

Bank of America CEO Ken Lewis
Should he be fired? As Bank of America's Stock Plummets, CEO Resists Some Calls That He Step Down.

Hookers for Jesus

Hookers for Jesus
Annie Lobert is the founder of "Hookers for Jesus" - www.hookersforjesus.net/home.cfm - Saving Sin City: Las Vegas, Nevada?

Forever personalized stamped envelope

Forever personalized stamped envelope
The Forever stamp will continue to cover the price of a first-class letter. The USPS will also introduce Forever personalized, stamped envelopes. The envelopes will be preprinted with a Forever stamp, the sender's name and return address, and an optional personal message.

Purple Heart

Purple Heart
First issued in 2003, the Purple heart stamp will continue to honor the men and women wounded while serving in the US military. The Purple Heart stamp covers the cost of 44 cents for first-class, one-ounce mail.

Dolphin

Dolphin
The bottlenose is just one of the new animals set to appear on the price-change stamps. It will serve as a 64-cent stamp for odd shaped envelopes.

2009 price-change stamps

2009 price-change stamps
www.boston.com/business/gallery/2009pircechangestamps/ -&- www.boston.com/news/nation/washington/articles/2009/02/27/new_stamps_set_for_rate_increase_in_may/

Red Sox v Yankees

Red Sox v Yankees
Go Red Sox!

President Barack Obama

President Barack Obama
AP photo v Shepard Fairey

Rush Limbaugh lackeys

Rush Limbaugh lackeys
Posted by Dan Wasserman of the Boston Globe on March 3, 2009.

Honest Abe

Honest Abe
A 2007 US Penny

Dog race

Dog race
Sledding for dogs

The Capital of the Constitution State

The Capital of the Constitution State
Hartford, once the wealthiest city in the United States but now the poorest in Connecticut, is facing an uphill battle.

Brady, Bundchen married

Brady, Bundchen married
Patriots quarterback Tom Brady and model Gisele Bundchen wed Feb. 26, 2009 in a Catholic ceremony in Los Angeles. www.boston.com/ae/celebrity/gallery/tom_gisele/

Mayor Jimmy Ruberto

Mayor Jimmy Ruberto
Tanked Pittsfield's local economy while helping his fellow insider political hacks and business campaign contributors!

Journalist Andrew Manuse

Journalist Andrew Manuse
www.manuse.com

New Hampshire Supreme Court Building

New Hampshire Supreme Court Building
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Hampshire_Supreme_Court

Economic State of the Union

Economic State of the Union
A look at some of the economic conditions the Obama administration faces and what resources have already been pledged to help. 2/24/2009

President Barack Obama

President Barack Obama
The president addresses the nation's governors during a dinner in the State Dinning Room, Sunday, Feb. 22, 2009, at the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari).

The Oscars - 2/22/2009.

The Oscars - 2/22/2009.
Hugh Jackman and Beyoncé Knowles teamed up for a musical medley during the show.

The 81st Academy Awards - Oscars - 2009

The 81st Academy Awards - Oscars - 2009
Hugh Jackman pulled actress Anne Hathaway on stage to accompany him during his opening musical number.

Rachel Maddow

Rachel Maddow
A Progressive News Commentator

$500,000 per year

$500,000 per year
That is chump change for the corporate elite!

THE CORPORATE ELITE...

THE CORPORATE ELITE...
Jeffrey R. Immelt, chairman and chief executive of General Electric

The Presidents' Club

The Presidents' Club
Bush, Obama, Bush Jr, Clinton & Carter.

5 Presidents: Bush, Obama, Bush Jr, Clinton, & Carter!

5 Presidents: Bush, Obama, Bush Jr, Clinton, & Carter!
White House Event: January 7, 2009.

Bank Bailout!

Bank Bailout!
v taxpayer

Actress Elizabeth Banks

Actress Elizabeth Banks
She will present an award to her hometown (Pittsfield) at the Massachusetts State House next month (1/2009). She recently starred in "W" and "Zack and Miri Make a Porno," and just signed a $1 million annual contract to be a spokesmodel for Paris.

Joanna Lipper

Joanna Lipper
Her award-winning 1999 documentary, "Growing Up Fast," about teenaged mothers in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.

Happy Holidays...

Happy Holidays...
...from "Star Wars"

Massachusetts "poor" economy

Massachusetts "poor" economy
Massachusetts is one of the wealthiest states, but it is also very inequitable. For example, it boasts the nation's most lucrative lottery, which is just a system of regressive taxation so that the corporate elite get to pay less in taxes!

Reese Witherspoon

Reese Witherspoon
Hollywood Actress

Peter G. Arlos.

Peter G. Arlos.
Arlos is shown in his Pittsfield office in early 2000.

Turnpike OK's hefty toll hikes

Turnpike OK's hefty toll hikes
Big Dig - East-west commuters take hit; Fees at tunnels would double. 11/15/2008.

The Pink Panther 2

The Pink Panther 2
Starring Steve Martin

Police ABUSE

Police ABUSE
I was a victim of Manchester Police Officer John Cunningham's ILLEGAL USES of FORCE! John Cunningham was reprimanded by the Chief of Police for disrespecting me. John Cunningham yelled at a witness: "I don't care if he (Jonathan Melle) is disabled!"

Barack Obama

Barack Obama
The 44th US President!

Vote

Vote
Elections

The Bailout & the economic stimulus check

The Bailout & the economic stimulus check
A political cartoon by Dan Wasserman

A rainbow over Boston

A rainbow over Boston
"Rainbows galore" 10/2/2008

Our nation's leaders!

Our nation's leaders!
President Bush with both John McCain & Barack Obama - 9/25/2008.

Massachusetts & Big Dig: Big hike in tolls for Pike looming (9/26/2008).

Massachusetts & Big Dig: Big hike in tolls for Pike looming (9/26/2008).
$5 rise at tunnels is one possibility $1 jump posed for elsewhere.

Mary E Carey

Mary E Carey
My FAVORITE Journalist EVER!

9/11/2008 - A Show of Unity!

9/11/2008 - A Show of Unity!
John McCain and Barack Obama appeared together at ground zero in New York City - September 11, 2008.

John McCain...

John McCain...
...has all but abandoned the positions on taxes, torture and immigration. (A cartoon by Dan Wasserman. September 2008).

Dan Wasserman

Dan Wasserman
The deregulated chickens come home to roost... in all our pocketbooks. September 2008.

Sarah Palin's phobia

Sarah Palin's phobia
A scripted candidate! (A cartoon by Dan Wasserman).

Dan Wasserman

Dan Wasserman
Family FInances - September, 2008.

Mark E. Roy

Mark E. Roy
Ward 1 Alderman for Manchester, NH (2008).

Theodore “Ted” L. Gatsas

Theodore “Ted” L. Gatsas
Ward 2 Alderman (& NH State Senator) for Manchester, NH (2008).

Peter M. Sullivan

Peter M. Sullivan
Ward 3 (downtown) Alderman for Manchester, NH (2008).

Jim Roy

Jim Roy
Ward 4 Alderman for Manchester, NH (2008).

Ed Osborne

Ed Osborne
Ward 5 Alderman for Manchester, NH (2008).

Real R. Pinard

Real R. Pinard
Ward 6 Alderman for Manchester, NH (2008).

William P. Shea

William P. Shea
Ward 7 Alderman for Manchester, NH (2008).

Betsi DeVries

Betsi DeVries
Ward 8 Alder-woman (& NH State Senator) for Manchester, NH (2008).

Michael Garrity

Michael Garrity
Ward 9 Alderman for Manchester, NH (2008).

George Smith

George Smith
Ward 10 Alderman for Manchester, NH (2008).

Russ Ouellette

Russ Ouellette
Ward 11 Alderman for Manchester, NH (2008).

Kelleigh (Domaingue) Murphy

Kelleigh (Domaingue) Murphy
Ward 12 Alder-woman for Manchester, NH (2008).

“Mike” Lopez

“Mike” Lopez
At-Large Alderman for Manchester, NH. (2008).

Daniel P. O’Neil

Daniel P. O’Neil
At-Large Alderman for Manchester, NH (2008).

Sarah Palin for Vice President.

Sarah Palin for Vice President.
Republican John McCain made the surprise pick of Alaska's governor Sarah Palin as his running mate today, August 29, 2008.

U.S. Representative John Olver, D-Amherst, Massachusetts.

U.S. Representative John Olver, D-Amherst, Massachusetts.
Congressman Olver said the country has spent well over a half-trillion dollars on the war in Iraq while the situation in Afghanistan continues to deteriorate. 8/25/08.

Ed O'Reilly for US Senate in Massachusetts!

Ed O'Reilly for US Senate in Massachusetts!
John Kerry's 9/2008 challenger in the Democratic Primary.

Shays' Rebellion

Shays' Rebellion
In a tax revolt, Massachusetts farmers fought back during Shays' Rebellion in the mid-1780s after The American Revolutionary War.

Julianne Moore

Julianne Moore
Actress. "The Big Lebowski" is one of my favorite movies. I also like "The Fugitive", too.

Rinaldo Del Gallo III & "Superman"

Rinaldo Del Gallo III & "Superman"
Go to: http://www.berkshirefatherhood.com/index.php?mact=News,cntnt01,detail,0&cntnt01articleid=699&cntnt01returnid=69

"Income chasm widening in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts"

"Income chasm widening in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts"
The gap between rich and poor has widened substantially in Massachusetts over the past two decades. (8/15/2008).

Dan "Bureaucrat" Bosley

Dan "Bureaucrat" Bosley
"The Bosley Amendment": To create tax loopholes for the wealthiest corporate interests in Massachusetts!

John Edwards and...

John Edwards and...
...Rielle Hunter. WHO CARES?!

Rep. Edward J. Markey

Rep. Edward J. Markey
He wants online-privacy legislation. Some Web Firms Say They Track Behavior Without Explicit Consent.

Cindy Sheehan

Cindy Sheehan
She gained fame with her antiwar vigil outside the Bush ranch.

Olympics kick off in Beijing

Olympics kick off in Beijing
Go USA!

Exxon Mobil 2Q profit sets US record, shares fall

Exxon Mobil 2Q profit sets US record, shares fall
In this May 1, 2008, file photo, a customer pumps gas at an Exxon station in Middleton, Mass. Exxon Mobil Corp. reported second-quarter earnings of $11.68 billion Thursday, July 31, the biggest quarterly profit ever by any U.S. corporation, but the results were well short of Wall Street expectations and its shares fell as markets opened. (AP Photo/Lisa Poole, File) 7/31/2008.

Onota Lake 'Sea Serpent'

Onota Lake 'Sea Serpent'
Some kind of monster on Onota Lake. Five-year-old Tyler Smith rides a 'sea serpent' on Onota Lake in Pittsfield, Mass. The 'monster,' fashioned by Smith's grandfather, first appeared over July 4 weekend. (Photo courtesy of Ron Smith). 7/30/2008.

Al Gore, Jr.

Al Gore, Jr.
Al Gore issues challenge on energy

The Norman Rockwell Museum

The Norman Rockwell Museum
Stockbridge, Massachusetts

"Big Dig"

"Big Dig"
Boston's financially wasteful pork barrel project!

"Big Dig"

"Big Dig"
Boston's pork barrel public works project cost 50 times more than the original price!

Mary E Carey

Mary E Carey
My favorite journalist EVER!

U.S. Rep. John Olver, state Sen. Stan Rosenberg and Selectwomen Stephanie O'Keeffe and Alisa Brewer

U.S. Rep. John Olver, state Sen. Stan Rosenberg and Selectwomen Stephanie O'Keeffe and Alisa Brewer
Note: Photo from Mary E Carey's Blog.

Tanglewood

Tanglewood
Boston Symphony Orchestra music director James Levine.

Google

Google
Chagall

Jimmy Ruberto

Jimmy Ruberto
Faces multiple persecutions under the Massachusetts "Ethics" conflict of interest laws.

Barack Obama

Barack Obama
Obama vows $500m in faith-based aid.

John McCain

John McCain
He is with his wife, Cindy, who were both met by Colombian President Alvaro Uribe (right) upon arriving in Cartagena.

Daniel Duquette

Daniel Duquette
Sold Mayor James M. Ruberto of Pittsfield two tickets to the 2004 World Series at face value.

Hillary & Barack in Unity, NH - 6/27/2008

Hillary & Barack in Unity, NH - 6/27/2008
Clinton tells Obama, crowd in Unity, N.H.: 'We are one party'

John Forbes Kerry

John Forbes Kerry
Wanna-be Prez?

WALL-E

WALL-E
"out of this World"

Crisis in the Congo - Ben Affleck

Crisis in the Congo - Ben Affleck
http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/popup?id=5057139&contentIndex=1&page=1&start=false - http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/story?id=5234555&page=1

Jeanne Shaheen

Jeanne Shaheen
NH's Democratic returning candidate for U.S. Senate

"Wall-E"

"Wall-E"
a cool robot

Ed O'Reilly

Ed O'Reilly
www.edoreilly.com

Go Celtics!

Go Celtics!
World Champions - 2008

Go Red Sox!

Go Red Sox!
J.D. Drew gets the same welcome whenever he visits the City of Brotherly Love: "Booooooo!"; Drew has been vilified in Philadelphia since refusing to sign with the Phillies after they drafted him in 1997...

Joe Kelly Levasseur & Joe Briggs

Joe Kelly Levasseur & Joe Briggs
www.2joes.org

NH Union Leader

NH Union Leader
Editorial Cartoon

Celtics - World Champions!

Celtics - World Champions!
www.boston.com/sports/basketball/celtics/gallery/06_18_08_front_pages/ - www.boston.com/sports/basketball/celtics/gallery/06_17_08_finals_game_6/ - www.boston.com/sports/basketball/celtics/gallery/06_17_08_celebration/ - www.boston.com/sports/basketball/celtics/gallery/06_15_08_celtics_championships/

"The Nation"

"The Nation"
A "Liberal" weekly political news magazine. Katrina vanden Heuvel.

TV - PBS: NOW

TV - PBS: NOW
http://www.pbs.org/now

The Twilight Zone

The Twilight Zone
List of Twilight Zone episodes - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Twilight_Zone_episodes

Equality for ALL Marriages

Equality for ALL Marriages
I, Jonathan Melle, am a supporter of same sex marriages.

Kobe Bryant leads his time to a Game 5 victory.

Kobe Bryant leads his time to a Game 5 victory.
L.A. Lakers holds on for the win to force Game 6 at Boston

Mohawk Trail

Mohawk Trail
The 'Hail to the Sunrise' statue in Charlemont is a well-known and easily recognized landmark on the Mohawk Trail. The trail once boasted several souvenir shops, some with motels and restaurants. Now only four remain. (Caroline Bonnivier / Berkshire Eagle Staff).

NASA - June 14, 2008

NASA - June 14, 2008
Space Shuttle Discovery returns to Earth.

Go Celtics! Game # 4 of the 2008 NBA Finals.

Go Celtics! Game # 4 of the 2008 NBA Finals.
Boston took a 20-second timeout, and the Celtics ran off four more points (including this incredible Erving-esque layup from Ray Allen) to build the lead to five points with just 2:10 remaining. Reeling, the Lakers took a full timeout to try to regain their momentum.

Sal DiMasi

Sal DiMasi
Speaker of the Massachusetts State House of Representatives

Kelly Ayotte - Attorney General of New Hampshire

Kelly Ayotte - Attorney General of New Hampshire
http://doj.nh.gov/

John Kerry

John Kerry
He does not like grassroots democracy & being challenged in the 2008 Massachusetts Democratic Party Primary for re-election.

Tim Murray

Tim Murray
Corrupt Lt. Gov. of Massachusetts, 2007 - 2013.

North Adams, Massachusetts

North Adams, Massachusetts
downtown

Howie Carr

Howie Carr
Political Satirist on Massachusetts Corruption/Politics

Polar Bear

Polar Bear
Global Warming

Elizabeth Warren - Web-Site Links

Elizabeth Warren - Web-Site Links
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Warren & http://www.creditslips.org/creditslips/WarrenAuthor.html

Elizabeth Warren

Elizabeth Warren
Consumer Crusader

Leon Powe

Leon Powe
Celtics forward Leon Powe finished a fast break with a dunk.

Kevin Garnett

Kevin Garnett
Kevin Garnett reacted during the game.

Rajon Rondo

Rajon Rondo
Rajon Rondo finished a first half fast break with a dunk.

Teamwork

Teamwork
Los Angeles Lakers teammates help Pau Gasol (16) from the floor in the second quarter.

Kobe Bryant

Kobe Bryant
Kobe Bryant took a shot in the first half of Game 2.

Kendrick Perkins

Kendrick Perkins
Kendrick Perkins (right) backed down Lamar Odom (left) during first half action.

Go Celtics!

Go Celtics!
The Boston Symphony Orchestra performed the national anthem prior to Game 2.

K.G.!

K.G.!
Garnett reacted to a hard dunk in the first quarter.

Paul Pierce

Paul Pierce
Paul Pierce reacted after hitting a three upon his return to the game since leaving with an injury.

Go Celtics!

Go Celtics!
Kobe Bryant (left) and Paul Pierce (right) squared off in the second half of the game.

James Taylor

James Taylor
Sings National Anthem at Celtics Game.

John Forbes Kerry & Deval Patrick

John Forbes Kerry & Deval Patrick
Attended Celtics Game.

Greats of the NBA: Dr. J, Bill Russell, & Kareem!

Greats of the NBA: Dr. J, Bill Russell, & Kareem!
Attend Game 1 of the 2008 NBA Finals.

Bruce Willis

Bruce Willis
The actor (left) and his date were in the crowd before the Celtics game.

John Kerry

John Kerry
Golddigger attends Celtics game

Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton
Ends her 2008 bid for Democratic Party nomination

Nonnie Burnes

Nonnie Burnes
Massachusetts Insurance Commish & former Judge

Jones Library

Jones Library
Amherst, Massachusetts

Barack Obama & Hillary Clinton

Barack Obama & Hillary Clinton
2008 Democratic Primary

"US vs Exxon and Halliburton"

"US vs Exxon and Halliburton"
U.S. Senator John Sununu took more than $220,000 from big oil.

Jeanne Shaheen

Jeanne Shaheen
4- U.S. Senate - 2008

William Pignatelli

William Pignatelli
Hack Rep. "Smitty" with Lynne Blake

Ben Bernanke

Ben Bernanke
Federal Reserve Chairman

Gazettenet.com

Gazettenet.com
www.gazettenet.com/beta/

Boys' & Girls' Club

Boys' & Girls' Club
Melville Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts

Denis Guyer

Denis Guyer
Dalton State Representative

The Berkshire Eagle

The Berkshire Eagle
Pittsfield, Massachusetts

Carmen Massimiano

Carmen Massimiano
Williams College - May 2008

Larry Bird & Magic Johnson

Larry Bird & Magic Johnson
www.boston.com/lifestyle/gallery/when_the_celtics_were_cool/

Regressive Taxation! via State Lotteries

Regressive Taxation! via State Lotteries
New Massachusetts state lottery game hits $600 million in sales!

Andrea Nuciforo

Andrea Nuciforo
"Luciforo"

John Barrett III

John Barrett III
Long-time Mayor of North Adams Massachusetts

Shine On

Shine On

Elmo

Elmo
cool!

Paul Pierce

Paul Pierce
Paul Pierce kissed the Eastern Conference trophy. 5/30/2008. AP Photo.

Kevin Garnett & Richard Hamilton

Kevin Garnett & Richard Hamilton
Kevin Garnett (left) talked to Pistons guard Richard Hamilton (right) after the Celtics' victory in Game 6. 5/30/2008. Reuters Photo.

Paul Pierce

Paul Pierce
Paul Pierce showed his team colors as the Celtics closed out the Pistons in Game 6 of the Eastern Conference finals. 5/30/2008. Globe Staff Photo / Jim Davis.

Joseph Kelly Levasseur

Joseph Kelly Levasseur
One of my favorite politicians!

Mary E Carey

Mary E Carey
In the Big Apple: NYC! She is the coolest!

Guyer & Kerry

Guyer & Kerry
My 2nd least favorite picture EVER!

Mary Carey

Mary Carey
My favorite journalist EVER!

Nuciforo & Ruberto

Nuciforo & Ruberto
My least favorite picture EVER!

Jeanne Shaheen

Jeanne Shaheen
U.S. Senate - 2008

NH Fisher Cats

NH Fisher Cats
AA Baseball - Toronto Blue Jays affiliate

Manchester, NH

Manchester, NH
Police Patch

Michael Briggs

Michael Briggs
#83 - We will never forget

Michael "Stix" Addison

Michael "Stix" Addison
http://unionleader.com/channel.aspx/News?channel=2af17ff4-f73b-4c44-9f51-092e828e1131

Charlie Gibson

Charlie Gibson
ABC News anchor

Scott McClellan

Scott McClellan
http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/m/scott_mcclellan/index.html?inline=nyt-per

Boise, Idaho

Boise, Idaho
Downtown Boise Idaho

John Forbes Kerry

John Forbes Kerry
Legislative Hearing in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, BCC, on Wednesday, May 28, 2008

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson
My favorite classical U.S. President!

NH Governor John Lynch

NH Governor John Lynch
Higher Taxes, Higher Tolls

Paul Hodes

Paul Hodes
My favorite Congressman!

Portland Sea Dogs

Portland Sea Dogs
AA Red Sox

New York

New York
Magnet

Massachusetts

Massachusetts
Magnet

New Hampshire

New Hampshire
Magnet

New Hampshire

New Hampshire
Button

Carmen Massimiano

Carmen Massimiano
"Luciforo" tried to send me to Carmen's Jail during the Spring & Summer of 1998.

Kay Khan - Massachusetts State Representative

Kay Khan - Massachusetts State Representative
www.openmass.org/members/show/174

Luciforo

Luciforo
Andrea F Nuciforo II

B-Eagle

B-Eagle
Pittsfield's monopoly/only daily newspaper

Jon Lester - Go Red Sox!

Jon Lester - Go Red Sox!
A Red Sox No Hitter on 5/19/2008!

Go Red Sox!

Go Red Sox!
Dustin Pedroia & Manny Ramirez

U.S. Flag

U.S. Flag
God Bless America!

Jonathan Melle's Blog

Jonathan Melle's Blog
Hello, Everyone!

Molly Bish

Molly Bish
We will never forget!

Go Celtics!

Go Celtics!
Celtics guard Rajon Rondo listens to some advice from Celtics head coach Doc Rivers in the first half.

Go Celtics!

Go Celtics!
Celtics forward Kevin Garnett and Pistons forward Rasheed Wallace embrace at the end of the game.

Go Red Sox!

Go Red Sox!
Red Sox closer Jonathan Papelbon calls for the ball as he charges toward first base. Papelbon made the out en route to picking up his 14th save of the season.

Go Red Sox!

Go Red Sox!
Red Sox starting pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka throws to Royals David DeJesus during the first inning.

Go Red Sox!

Go Red Sox!
Red Sox pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka delivers a pitch to Royals second baseman Mark Grudzielanek during the second inning.

Go Red Sox!

Go Red Sox!
Red Sox right fielder J.D. Drew is welcomed to home plate by teammates Mike Lowell (left), Kevin Youkilis (2nd left) and Manny Ramirez after he hit a grand slam in the second inning.

Go Red Sox!

Go Red Sox!
Red Sox third baseman Mike Lowell crosses the plate after hitting a grand slam during the sixth inning. Teammates Manny Ramirez and Jacoby Ellsbury scored on the play. The Red Sox went on to win 11-8 to complete a four-game sweep and perfect homestand.

JD Drew - Go Red Sox

JD Drew - Go Red Sox
www.boston.com/sports/baseball/redsox/gallery/05_22_08_sox_royals/

Thank you for serving; God Bless America!

Thank you for serving; God Bless America!
Master Sgt. Kara B. Stackpole, of Westfield, holds her daughter, Samantha, upon her return today to Westover Air Reserve Base in Chicopee. She is one of the 38 members of the 439th Aeromedical Staging Squadron who returned after a 4-month deployment in Iraq. Photo by Dave Roback / The Republican.

Kathi-Anne Reinstein

Kathi-Anne Reinstein
www.openmass.org/members/show/175

Ted Kennedy

Ted Kennedy
Tragic diagnosis: Get well Senator!

Google doodle - Jonathan Melle Internet search

Google doodle - Jonathan Melle Internet search
http://blogsearch.google.com/blogsearch?hl=en&q=jonathan+melle+blogurl:http://jonathanmelleonpolitics.blogspot.com/&ie=UTF-8

John Forbes Kerry

John Forbes Kerry
Billionaire U.S. Senator gives address to MCLA graduates in North Adams, Massachusetts in mid-May 2008

Andrea Nuciforo

Andrea Nuciforo
"Luciforo"

A Red Sox Fan in Paris, France

A Red Sox Fan in Paris, France
Go Red Sox!

Rinaldo Del Gallo III

Rinaldo Del Gallo III
Interviewed on local TV

Andrea Nuciforo

Andrea Nuciforo
Luciforo!

John Adams

John Adams
#2 U.S. President

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
I stood under a tree on the afternoon of May 9, 2008, on the foregrounds of the NH State House - www.websitetoolbox.com/tool/post/nhinsider/vpost?id=2967773

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
Inside the front lobby of the NH State House

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
Bill Clinton campaign memorabilia

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
Liberty Bell & NH State House

Jon Keller

Jon Keller
Boston based political analyst

Jon Keller

Jon Keller
Boston based political analyst

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
Franklin Pierce Statue #14 U.S. President

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
NH State House

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
Stop the War NOW!

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
"Mr. Melle, tear down this Blog!"

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
I stood next to a JFK photo

Jonathan Levine, Publisher

Jonathan Levine, Publisher
The Pittsfield Gazette Online

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
I made rabbit ears with John & George

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
I made antenna ears with John & George

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
I impersonated Howard Dean

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
mock-voting

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
pretty ladies -/- Go to: http://www.wgir.com/cc-common/cc_photopop20.html?eventID=28541&pagecontent=&pagenum=4 - Go to: http://current.com/items/88807921_veterans_should_come_first_not_last# - http://www.mcam23.com/cgi-bin/cutter.cgi?c_function=STREAM?c_feature=EDIT?dir_catagory=10MorningRadio?dir_folder=2JoesClips?dir_file=JonathanMelle-090308? -

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
Go Red Sox! Me at Fenway Park

Mary E. Carey

Mary E. Carey
My favorite journalist! Her voice sings for the Voiceless. -/- Go to: http://aboutamherst.blogspot.com/search?q=melle -/- Go to: http://ongeicocaveman.blogspot.com/search?q=melle

Velvet Jesus

Velvet Jesus
Mary Carey blogs about my political writings. This is a picture of Jesus from her childhood home in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. -//- "How Can I Keep From Singing" : My life goes on in endless song / Above Earth's lamentations, / I hear the real, though far-off hymn / That hails a new creation. / / Through all the tumult and the strife / I hear its music ringing, / It sounds an echo in my soul. / How can I keep from singing? / / Whey tyrants tremble in their fear / And hear their death knell ringing, / When friends rejoice both far and near / How can I keep from singing? / / In prison cell and dungeon vile / Our thoughts to them are winging / When friends by shame are undefiled / How can I keep from singing?

www.truthdig.com

www.truthdig.com
www.truthdig.com

Jonathan Melle

Jonathan Melle
Concord NH

The Huffington Post

The Huffington Post
http://fundrace.huffingtonpost.com/neighbors.php?type=loc&newest=1&addr=&zip=01201&search=Search

Barack Obama

Barack Obama
smiles & beer

Jonathan Lothrop

Jonathan Lothrop
A Pittsfield City Councilor

Michael L. Ward

Michael L. Ward
A Pittsfield City Councilor

Peter Marchetti - Pittsfield's City Councilor at Large

Peter Marchetti - Pittsfield's City Councilor at Large
Pete always sides with the wealthy's political interests.

Gerald Lee - Pittsfield's City Council Prez

Gerald Lee - Pittsfield's City Council Prez
Gerald Lee told me that I am a Social Problem; Lee executes a top-down system of governance.

Matt Kerwood - Pittsfield's Councilor at Large

Matt Kerwood - Pittsfield's Councilor at Large
Kerwood poured coffee drinks for Jane Swift

Louis Costi

Louis Costi
Pittsfield City Councilor

Lewis Markham

Lewis Markham
Pittsfield City Councilor

Kevin Sherman - Pittsfield City Councilor

Kevin Sherman - Pittsfield City Councilor
Sherman ran for Southern Berkshire State Rep against Smitty Pignatelli; Sherman is a good guy.

Anthony Maffuccio

Anthony Maffuccio
Pittsfield City Councilor

Linda Tyer

Linda Tyer
Pittsfield City Councilor

Daniel Bianchi

Daniel Bianchi
A Pittsfield City Councilor

The Democratic Donkey

The Democratic Donkey
Democratic Party Symbol

Paramount

Paramount
What is Paramount to you?

NH's Congresswoman

NH's Congresswoman
Carol Shea-Porter, Democrat

Sam Adams Beer

Sam Adams Beer
Boston Lager

Ratatouille

Ratatouille
Disney Animation

Ruberto Details Plans for Success - January 07, 2008

Ruberto Details Plans for Success - January 07, 2008
"Luciforo" swears in Mayor Ruberto. Pittsfield Politics at its very worst: 2 INSIDER POWERBROKERS! Where is Carmen Massimiano? He must be off to the side.

Abe

Abe
Lincoln

Optimus Prime

Optimus Prime
Leader of the Autobots

Optimus Prime

Optimus Prime
1984 Autobot Transformer Leader

Cleanup Agreements - GE & Pittsfield's PCBs toxic waste sites

Cleanup Agreements - GE & Pittsfield's PCBs toxic waste sites
www.epa.gov/region1/ge/cleanupagreement.html

GE/Housatonic River Site: Introduction

GE/Housatonic River Site: Introduction
www.epa.gov/region1/ge/

GE/Housatonic River Site - Reports

GE/Housatonic River Site - Reports
www.epa.gov/region1/ge/thesite/opca-reports.html

US EPA - Contact - Pittsfield's PCBs toxic waste sites

US EPA - Contact -  Pittsfield's PCBs toxic waste sites
www.epa.gov/region1/ge/contactinfo.html

GE Corporate Logo - Pittsfield's PCBs toxic waste sites

GE Corporate Logo - Pittsfield's PCBs toxic waste sites
www.epa.gov/region1/ge/index.html

Commonwealth Connector

Commonwealth Connector
Commonwealth Care

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts
Healthcare Reform

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts
Healthcare Reform

Network Health Forward - A Commonwealth Care Plan

Network Health Forward - A Commonwealth Care Plan
Massachusetts Health Reform

Network Health Together: A MassHealth Plan - Commonwealth Care

Network Health Together: A MassHealth Plan - Commonwealth Care
Massachusetts Health Reform

www.network-health.org

www.network-health.org
Massachusetts Health Reform

Neighborhood Health Plan - Commonwealth Care

Neighborhood Health Plan - Commonwealth Care
Massachusetts Health Reform

Fallon Community Health Plan - Commonwealth Care

Fallon Community Health Plan - Commonwealth Care
Massachusetts Health Reform

BMC HealthNet Plan

BMC HealthNet Plan
Massachusetts Health Reform

Massachusetts Health Reform

Massachusetts Health Reform
Eligibility Chart: 2007

Harvard Pilgrim Healthcare

Harvard Pilgrim Healthcare
Massachusetts Health Reform

Business Peaks

Business Peaks
Voodoo Economics

Laffer Curve - Corporate Elite

Laffer Curve - Corporate Elite
Reagonomics: Supply Side

Corporate Elite Propaganda

Corporate Elite Propaganda
Mock Liberal Democratic Socialism Thinking

Real Estate Blues

Real Estate Blues
www.boston.com/bostonglobe/magazine/2008/0316/

PEACE

PEACE
End ALL Wars!

Freedom of Speech

Freedom of Speech
Norman Rockwell's World War II artwork depicting America's values

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
A young Abe Lincoln

RACHEL KAPRIELIAN

RACHEL KAPRIELIAN
www.openmass.org/members/show/218 - www.rachelkaprielian.com

Jennifer M. Callahan - Massachusetts State Representative

Jennifer M. Callahan - Massachusetts State Representative
www.openmass.org/members/show/164 - www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2008/05/04/legislator_describes_threat_as_unnerving/

Human Rights for ALL Peoples!

Human Rights for ALL Peoples!
My #1 Political Belief!

Anne Frank

Anne Frank
Amsterdam, Netherlands, Europe

A young woman Hillary supporter

A young woman Hillary supporter
This excellent picture captures a youth's excitement

Hillary Clinton with Natalie Portman

Hillary Clinton with Natalie Portman
My favorite Actress!

Alan Chartock

Alan Chartock
WAMC public radio in Albany, NY; Political columnist who writes about Berkshire County area politics; Strong supporter for Human Rights for ALL Peoples

OpenCongress.Org

OpenCongress.Org
This web-site uses some of my Blog postings

OpenMass.org

OpenMass.org
This web-site uses some of my blog postings!

Shannon O'Brien

Shannon O'Brien
One of my favorite politicians! She stands for the People first!

The Massachusetts State House

The Massachusetts State House
"The Almighty Golden Dome" - www.masslegislature.tv -

Sara Hathaway

Sara Hathaway
Former Mayor of Pittsfield, Massachusetts

Andrea F. Nuciforo, Jr.

Andrea F. Nuciforo, Jr.
A corrupt Pol who tried to put me in Jail

Andrea F. Nuciforo, Jr.

Andrea F. Nuciforo, Jr.
Another view of Pittsfield's inbred, multigenerational political prince. Luciforo!

Luciforo

Luciforo
Nuciforo's nickname

"Andy" Nuciforo

"Andy" Nuciforo
Luciforo!

Carmen C. Massimiano, Jr., Berkshire County Sheriff (Jailer)

Carmen C. Massimiano, Jr., Berkshire County Sheriff (Jailer)
Nuciforo's henchman! Nuciforo tried to send me to Carmen's Jail

Andrea Nuciforo Jr

Andrea Nuciforo Jr
Shhh! Luciforo's other job is working as a private attorney defending wealthy Boston-area corporate insurance companies

Berkshire County Sheriff (Jailer) Carmen C. Massimiano, Jr.

Berkshire County Sheriff (Jailer) Carmen C. Massimiano, Jr.
Nuciforo tried to send me to Carmen's Jail! Carmen sits with the Congressman, John Olver

Congressman John Olver

Congressman John Olver
Nuciforo's envy

The Dome of the U.S. Capitol

The Dome of the U.S. Capitol
Our Beacon of American Democracy

Nuciforo's architect

Nuciforo's architect
Mary O'Brien in red with scarf

Sara Hathaway (www.brynmawr.edu)

Sara Hathaway (www.brynmawr.edu)
Former-Mayor of Pittsfield, Massachusetts; Nuciforo intimidated her, along with another woman, from running in a democratic state election in the Spring of 2006!

Andrea F. Nuciforo II

Andrea F. Nuciforo II
Pittsfield Politics

Berkshire County Republican Association

Berkshire County Republican Association
Go to: www.fcgop.blogspot.com

Denis Guyer

Denis Guyer
Dalton State Representative

John Forbes Kerry & Denis Guyer

John Forbes Kerry & Denis Guyer
U.S. Senator & State Representative

John Kerry

John Kerry
Endorses Barack Obama for Prez then visits Berkshire County

Dan Bosley

Dan Bosley
A Bureaucrat impostering as a Legislator!

Ben Downing

Ben Downing
Berkshire State Senator

Christopher N Speranzo

Christopher N Speranzo
Pittsfield's ANOINTED State Representative

Peter J. Larkin

Peter J. Larkin
Corrupt Lobbyist

GE - Peter Larkin's best friend!

GE - Peter Larkin's best friend!
GE's FRAUDULENT Consent Decree with Pittsfield, Massachusetts, will end up KILLING many innocent school children & other local residents!

GE's CEO Jack Welch

GE's CEO Jack Welch
The Corporate System's Corporate Elite's King

Economics: Where Supply meets Demand

Economics: Where Supply meets Demand
Equilibrium

GE & Pittsfield, Massachusetts

GE & Pittsfield, Massachusetts
In 2007, GE sold its Plastics Division to a Saudi company. Now all that is left over by GE are its toxic PCB pollutants that cause cancer in many Pittsfield residents.

Mayor James M Ruberto

Mayor James M Ruberto
A small-time pol chooses to serve the corporate elite & other elites over the people.

Governor Deval Patrick

Governor Deval Patrick
Deval shakes hands with Mayors in Berkshire County

Deval Patrick

Deval Patrick
Governor of Massachusetts

Pittsfield High School

Pittsfield High School
Pittsfield, Massachusetts

Sara Hathaway

Sara Hathaway
Pittsfield's former Mayor

Rinaldo Del Gallo III

Rinaldo Del Gallo III
Pittsfield Attorney focusing on Father's Rights Probate Court Legal Issues, & Local Politician and Political Observer

Rinaldo Del Gallo III

Rinaldo Del Gallo III
Very Intelligent Political Activists in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Rinaldo Del Gallo, III, Esq. is the spokesperson of the Berkshire Fatherhood Coalition. He has been practicing family law and has been a member of the Massachusetts bar since 1996.

Mayor Ed Reilly

Mayor Ed Reilly
He supports Mayor Ruberto & works as a municipal Attorney. As Mayor, he backed Bill Weld for Governor in 1994, despite being a Democrat. He was joined by Carmen Massimiano & John Barrett III, the long-standing Mayor of North Adams.

Manchester, NH Mayor Frank Guinta

Manchester, NH Mayor Frank Guinta
Cuts Dental Care for Public School Children-in-Need

Manchester, NH City Hall

Manchester, NH City Hall
My new hometown - view from Hanover St. intersection with Elm St.

Manchester NH City Democrats

Manchester NH City Democrats
Go Dems!

2008 Democratic Candidates for U.S. Prez

2008 Democratic Candidates for U.S. Prez
Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, Mike Gravel, Dennis Kucinich, John Edwards

NH State House Dome

NH State House Dome
Concord, NH

Donna Walto

Donna Walto
Pittsfield Politician -- She strongly opposes Mayor Jim Ruberto's elitist tenure.

Elmo

Elmo
Who doesn't LOVE Elmo?

Hillary Clinton for U.S. President!

Hillary Clinton for U.S. President!
Hillary is for Children. She is my choice in 2008.

The White House in 1800

The White House in 1800
Home of our Presidents of the United States

John Adams

John Adams
2nd President of the USA

Hillary Clinton stands with John Edwards and Joe Biden

Hillary Clinton stands with John Edwards and Joe Biden
Hillary is my choice for U.S. President!

Bill Clinton

Bill Clinton
Former President Bill Clinton speaks at the Radisson in Manchester NH 11/16/2007

Barack Obama

Barack Obama
U.S. Senator & Candidate for President

Pittsfield's 3 Women City Councillors - 2004

Pittsfield's 3 Women City Councillors - 2004
Linda Tyer, Pam Malumphy, Tricia Farley-Bouvier

Wahconah Park in Pittsfield, Massachusetts

Wahconah Park in Pittsfield, Massachusetts
My friend Brian Merzbach reviews baseball parks around the nation.

The Corporate Elite: Rational Incentives for only the wealthy

The Corporate Elite: Rational Incentives for only the wealthy
The Elites double their $ every 6 to 8 years, while the "have-nots" double their $ every generation (or 24 years). Good bye Middle Class!

George Will

George Will
The human satellite voice for the Corporate Elite

Elizabeth Warren

Elizabeth Warren
The Anti-George Will; Harvard Law School Professor; The Corporate Elite's Worst Nightmare

The Flag of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts

The Flag of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts
I was born and raised in Pittsfield, Massachusetts

State Senator Stan Rosenberg

State Senator Stan Rosenberg
Democratic State Senator from Amherst, Massachusetts -/- Anti-Stan Rosenberg Blog: rosenbergwatch.blogspot.com

Ellen Story

Ellen Story
Amherst Massachusetts' State Representative

Teen Pregnancy in Pittsfield, Mass.

Teen Pregnancy in Pittsfield, Mass.
Books are being written on Pittsfield's high teen pregancy rates! What some intellectuals do NOT understand about the issue is that TEEN PREGNANCIES in Pittsfield double the statewide average by design - Perverse Incentives!

NH Governor John Lynch

NH Governor John Lynch
Supports $30 Scratch Tickets and other forms of regressive taxation. Another Pol that only serves his Corporate Elite Masters instead of the People!

U.S. Congresswoman Carol Shea Porter

U.S. Congresswoman Carol Shea Porter
The first woman whom the People of New Hampshire have voted in to serve in U.S. Congress

U.S. Congressman Paul Hodes

U.S. Congressman Paul Hodes
A good man who wants to bring progressive changes to Capitol Hill!

Paul Hodes for U.S. Congress

Paul Hodes for U.S. Congress
New Hampshire's finest!

Darth Vader

Darth Vader
Star Wars

Dick Cheney & George W. Bush

Dick Cheney & George W. Bush
The Gruesome Two-some! Stop the Neo-Cons' fascism! End the Iraq War NOW!

WAROPOLY

WAROPOLY
The Inequity of Globalism

Bushopoly!

Bushopoly!
The Corporate Elite have redesigned "The System" to enrich themselves at the expense of the people, masses, have-nots, poor & middle-class families

George W. Bush with Karl Rove

George W. Bush with Karl Rove
Rove was a political strategist with extraordinary influence within the Bush II White House

2008's Republican Prez-field

2008's Republican Prez-field
John McCain, Alan Keyes, Rudy Guiliani, Duncan Hunter, Mike Huckabee, WILLARD Mitt Romney, Fred Thompson, Ron Paul

Fall in New England

Fall in New England
Autumn is my favorite season

Picturing America

Picturing America
picturingamerica.neh.gov

Winter Weather Map

Winter Weather Map
3:45PM EST 3-Dec-07

Norman Rockwell Painting

Norman Rockwell Painting
Thanksgiving

Norman Rockwell Painting

Norman Rockwell Painting
Depiction of American Values in mid-20th Century America

Larry Bird #33

Larry Bird #33
My favorite basketball player of my childhood

Boston Celtics Basketball - 2007-2008

Boston Celtics Basketball - 2007-2008
Kevin Garnett hugs James Posey

Paul Pierce

Paul Pierce
All heart! Awesome basketball star for The Boston Celtics.

Tom Brady

Tom Brady
Go Patriots!

Rupert Murdoch

Rupert Murdoch
Owner of Fox News - CORPORATE ELITE!

George Stephanopolous

George Stephanopolous
A Corporate Elite Political News Analyst

Robert Redford

Robert Redford
Starred in the movie "Lions for Lambs"

Meryl Streep

Meryl Streep
Plays a jaded journalist with integrity in the movie "Lions for Lambs"

Tom Cruise

Tom Cruise
Tom Cruise plays the Neo-Con D.C. Pol purely indoctrinated by the Corporate Elite's political agenda in the Middle East

CHARLIZE THERON

CHARLIZE THERON
"I want to say I've never been surrounded by so many fake breasts, but I went to the Academy Awards."

Amherst Town Library

Amherst Town Library
Amherst, NH - www.amherstlibrary.org

Manchester NH Library

Manchester NH Library
I use the library's automated timed 1-hour-per-day Internet computers to post on my Blog - www.manchester.lib.nh.us

Manchester NH's Palace Theater

Manchester NH's Palace Theater
Manchester NH decided to restore its Palace Theater

Pittsfield's Palace Theater

Pittsfield's Palace Theater
Pittsfield tore down this landmark on North Street in favor of a parking lot

Pleasant Street Theater

Pleasant Street Theater
Amherst, Massachusetts

William "Shitty" Pignatelli

William "Shitty" Pignatelli
A top down & banal State House Pol from Lenox Massachusetts -- A GOOD MAN!

The CIA & Mind Control

The CIA & Mind Control
Did the CIA murder people by proxy assassins?

Skull & Bones

Skull & Bones
Yale's Elite

ImpeachBush.org

ImpeachBush.org
I believe President Bush should be IMPEACHED because he is waging an illegal and immoral war against Iraq!

Bob Feuer drumming for U.S. Congress v John Olver in 2008

Bob Feuer drumming for U.S. Congress v John Olver in 2008
www.blog.bobfeuer.us

Abe Lincoln

Abe Lincoln
The 16th President of the USA

Power

Power
Peace

Global Warming Mock Giant Thermometer

Global Warming Mock Giant Thermometer
A member of Green Peace activist sets up a giant thermometer as a symbol of global warming during their campaign in Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia, Sunday, Dec. 2, 2007. World leaders launch marathon negotiations Monday on how to fight global warming, which left unchecked could cause devastating sea level rises, send millions further into poverty and lead to the mass extinction of plants and animals.

combat global warming...

combat global warming...
...or risk economic and environmental disaster caused by rising temperatures

www.climatecrisiscoalition.org

www.climatecrisiscoalition.org
P.O. Box 125, South Lee, MA 01260, (413) 243-5665, tstokes@kyotoandbeyond.org, www.kyotoandbeyond.org

3 Democratic presidentional candidates

3 Democratic presidentional candidates
Democratic presidential candidates former senator John Edwards (from right) and Senators Joe Biden and Chris Dodd before the National Public Radio debate yesterday (12/4/2007).

The UN Seal

The UN Seal
An archaic & bureaucratic post WW2 top-down, non-democratic institution that also stands for some good governance values

Superman

Superman
One of my favorite childhood heroes and movies

Web-Site on toxic toys

Web-Site on toxic toys
www.healthytoys.org

Batman

Batman
One of my favorite super-heroes

Deval Patrick & Denis Guyer

Deval Patrick & Denis Guyer
Massachusetts' Governor stands with Dalton's State Rep. Denis E. Guyer.

Bill Cosby & Denis Guyer

Bill Cosby & Denis Guyer
TV Star Bill Cosby stands with Denis E. Guyer

Denis Guyer with his supporters

Denis Guyer with his supporters
Dalton State Representative

Denis Guyer goes to college

Denis Guyer goes to college
Dalton State Representative

Peter Marchetti

Peter Marchetti
He is my second cousin. Pete Marchetti favors MONEY, not fairness!

Matt Barron & Denis Guyer with couple

Matt Barron & Denis Guyer with couple
Matt Barron plays DIRTY politics against his opponents!

Nat Karns

Nat Karns
Top-Down Executive Director of the ELITIST Berkshire Regional Planning Commission

Human Rights for All Peoples & people

Human Rights for All Peoples & people
Stop Anti-Semitism

Massachusetts State Treasurer Tim Cahill

Massachusetts State Treasurer Tim Cahill
State House, Room 227, Boston, MA 02133, 617-367-6900, www.mass.gov/treasury/

Massachusetts State Attorney General Martha Coakley

Massachusetts State Attorney General Martha Coakley
1350 Main Street, Springfield, MA 01103, 413-784-1240 / McCormick Building, One Asburton Place, Boston, MA 02108, 617-727-4765 / marthacoakley.com / www.ago.state.ma.us

Bush v. Gore: December 12, 2007, was the seventh anniversary, the 5-4 Supreme Court decision...

Bush v. Gore: December 12, 2007, was the seventh anniversary, the 5-4 Supreme Court decision...
www.takebackthecourt.org - A political billboard near my downtown apartment in Manchester, NH

Marc Murgo

Marc Murgo
An old friend of mine from Pittsfield

Downtown Manchester, NH

Downtown Manchester, NH
www.newhampshire.com/nh-towns/manchester.aspx

Marisa Tomei

Marisa Tomei
Movie Actress

Massachusetts Coalition for Healthy Communities (MCHC)

Massachusetts Coalition for Healthy Communities (MCHC)
www.masschc.org/issue.php

Mike Firestone & Anna Weisfeiler

Mike Firestone & Anna Weisfeiler
Mike Firestone works in Manchester NH for Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign

James Pindell

James Pindell
Covers NH Primary Politcs for The Boston Globe

U.S. History - Declaration

U.S. History - Declaration
A 19th century engraving shows Benjamin Franklin, left, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Philip Livingston and Roger Sherman at work on the Declaration of Independence.

Boston Globe Photos of the Week - www.boston.com/bostonglobe/gallery/

Boston Globe Photos of the Week - www.boston.com/bostonglobe/gallery/
Sybregje Palenstijn (left), who plays Sarah Godbertson at Plimouth Plantation, taught visitors how to roast a turkey on a spit. The plantation often sees a large influx of visitors during the holiday season.

Chris Hodgkins

Chris Hodgkins
Another special interest Berkshire Pol who could not hold his "WATER" on Beacon Hill's State House!

The Big Dig - 15 tons of concrete fell from a tunnel ceiling onto Milena Del Valle's car.

The Big Dig - 15 tons of concrete fell from a tunnel ceiling onto Milena Del Valle's car.
Most of Boston's Big Dig highway remains closed, after a woman was crushed when 15 tons of concrete fell from a tunnel ceiling onto her car. (ABC News)

Jane Swift

Jane Swift
Former Acting Governor of Massachusetts & Berkshire State Senator

Paul Cellucci

Paul Cellucci
Former Massachusetts Governor

William Floyd Weld

William Floyd Weld
$80 Million Trust Fund Former Governor of Massachusetts

Mike Dukakis

Mike Dukakis
Former Governor of Massachusetts

Mary E. Carey

Mary E. Carey
Amherst, Massachusetts, Journalist and Blogger

Caveman

Caveman
www.ongeicocaveman.blogspot.com

Peter G. Arlos

Peter G. Arlos
"The biggest challenge Pittsfield faces is putting its fiscal house in order. The problem is that doing so requires structural changes in local government, many of which I have advocated for years, but which officials do not have the will to implement. Fiscal responsibility requires more than shifting funds from one department to another. Raising taxes and fees and cutting services are not the answer. Structural changes in the way services are delivered and greater productivity are the answer, and without these changes the city's fiscal crisis will not be solved."

James M. Ruberto

James M. Ruberto
"Pittsfield's biggest challenge is to find common ground for a better future. The city is at a crossroads. On one hand, our quality of life is challenged. On the other hand, some important building blocks are in place that could be a strong foundation for our community. Pittsfield needs to unite for the good of its future. The city needs an experienced businessman and a consensus builder who will invite the people to hold him accountable."

Matt Kerwood

Matt Kerwood
Pittsfield's Councilor-At-Large. Go to: extras.berkshireeagle.com/NeBe/profiles/12.htm

Gerald M. Lee

Gerald M. Lee
Pittsfield's City Council Prez. Top-down governance of the first order!

Mary Carey

Mary Carey
Mary with student

Boston Red Sox

Boston Red Sox
Jonathan Papelbon celebrates with Jason Varitek

Free Bernard Baran!

Free Bernard Baran!
www.freebaran.org

Political Intelligence

Political Intelligence
Capitol Hill

Sherwood Guernsey II

Sherwood Guernsey II
Wealthy Williamstown Political Activist & Pittsfield Attorney

Mary Carey 2

Mary Carey 2
California Pol & porn star

Pittsfield's Good Old Boy Network - Political Machine!

Pittsfield's Good Old Boy Network - Political Machine!
Andy "Luciforo" swears in Jimmy Ruberto for the returning Mayor's 3rd term

Berkshire Grown

Berkshire Grown
www.berkshiregrown.org

Rambo

Rambo

The Mount was built in 1902 & was home to Edith Wharton (1862-1937) from 1903 to 1908.

The Mount was built in 1902 & was home to Edith Wharton (1862-1937) from 1903 to 1908.
The Mount, the historic home in Lenox of famed American novelist Edith Wharton, is facing foreclosure.